The Entrepreneur Podcast
The Entrepreneur Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

13. Building a product for yourself with Sarah Sklash of The June Motel

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

For the first episode of 2020, Eric Janssen speaks to Sarah Sklash, HBA ’07, co-owner of The June Motel, a 16-room boutique motel in Prince Edward County.

Find out how a New Years Resolution helped Sarah take the leap from side hustle, to full-time entrepreneur, who together with her business partner, chose to transform the ‘diviest motel you’ve ever seen,’ into one of Ontario's most Instagrammable experiences.

You're listening to the Ivy Entrepreneur podcast from the Pierre L Morrisset Institute for Entrepreneurship at the Ivy Business School. In this series, Ivy Entrepreneur and Ivy Faculty member Eric Jansson will anchor the session. Sarah, welcome to the Ivy Entrepreneur podcast. Thank you, happy to be here. Yeah, good to have you in. So, firstly I had to point out, I couldn't let us slip by, that you were originally a Windsor residents at right. You grew up in Windsor Sir was yeah, grew up in Windsor. We have to call that out whenever we get a chance, raising up entrepreneurs from Windsor Yeah, are you from Windsor I am Oh, no, way, oh, cool, yeah, born days and well Nice. Yeah. So, Sarah, I want to start with the question. What is the June or what is the June hotel? The June motel is a retro but fresh, Boutique Motel brand. We started off in Prince Edward County with a sixteen room motel and we've recently purchased our second property and Salpo beach. And where can people find these properties? So our website is the June motelcom or you can find us on instagram at the June motel or follow kind of our behind the scenes journey on at motelier life. That's motelier, like hotelier, but with an m. take me, if you would, back to where these entrepreneurial inklings started. So I know earlier on you had mentioned when we were talking ahead of time, no interest in being an entrepreneur right out of school, but now you are full bore into it. So, like, where did the inklings even start for you? The inklings started when I started binge watching dragons den. So work for the government. I'm sure will chat about that a bit. But just started seeing this other kind of path. Did a fuel very unsuccessful side hustles and eventually just wanted this opportunity to be creative, to really set my own path, and that's when I was like, okay, I need to take the leap, do something new and become an entrepreneur. Okay, so you took some swings. What were the side hustles and when did to do those? So, as I said, really unsuccessful. I bought about a thousand dollars worth of Turkish towels I think I still have like nine hundred and fifty dollars worth of Turkish towels, like lifetime supply a towels. Still and then the other one was I was called in Silk Cram. So it was you can make a silk scarf with your own instagram photos. Also not very successful. So when did you when did you come up with these ideas? Like when did you start trying things out like this? Really it was sad. I'm trying to think, whenever dragons in came on Netflix. It was shortly after that it that just started getting this idea to do something creative on the side. So you graduated in Oh, six hundred seven hundred and seven, and these side hustles were postgraduation while you were out working full time. Yeah, it's it was probably five years after graduation. Okay. And what was the maybe dig back then? You had mentioned before, no inklings when you were a student or before that. What changed from Heck No, I'm not going to do when I'm a student, to interesting, I'm going to start trying some things and taking some swings. I think so. In government there's a limited opportunity to be really a creative. You are often getting things approved by twenty people above you, and I think so it was kind of in contrast to what I was doing there was partly giving me that inkling to say, okay, let me, let me try something and just create it all myself. Got It. So that was your outlet for some sort of creativity. Anything when that you can think of, maybe...

...reflecting back when you were young that led to this need to creatively express yourself or eventually go it on your own. The way you were raised. was there anything that you were growing up even to this day? Like I remember being at Ivy never thinking I was going to be an entrepreneur. I am a doer. I really like I like to get things done, which I think is a great quality, and an entrepreneur, but I was also happy to just follow someone else's vision for quite a while. So yeah, I I can't really kind of dig down into where that came from, other than just maybe a like being a creative person and I think entrepreneurship really lends itself well to creativity. Cool. Okay, so you are trying some things, taking some swings on these side Hustles, your words, not phenomenally successful. Know where did the idea come from for the June. Sure, so I have a business partner WHO's one of my best friends and the June came from really just like I've both of us being in this place where like, okay, we're ready for real life change, let's get together, let's brainstorm a whole bunch of ideas. We both really like wine, so that is kind of where we started. The brainstorm was whatever we did was gonna be kind of surrounding wine and I know kind of motel seems like a stretch now, but the two of US had gone and done a race in Prince Edward County and two thousand and twelve. Back then it wasn't quite as well known as it is now, but spent three years hunting to buy a cauage out there and kind of that time both of US experienced there was no place to stay. It was a lot of old fashioned B and bees diving motels. So we knew that there was a need for something in the area. I've always loved travel, followed kind of travel trends and had seen, you know, other people doing cool things with motels. But anyway, we we weren't didn't start off with going right into the buying the motel. It was we were going to do just like one weekend, run a wine camp. It was going to be, you know, low risk. But I was closely following the real estate market out there and knew that there was this motel for sale, and so we're like, okay, we're going to take over this motel, bring in a bunch of people to do this like weekend wine camp. We're like, but the motels kind of gross, so we're going to have to, you know, bring a new bedding, bringing some plans, bringing lots of wine, and then we're like, or you know, at that point, why don't we just buy it? So we bought like the divs motel you've ever seen. Wow, so there's a lot. There's a lot here. Love you, I pack a little bit. So the what was sounds like you wanted to run just a weekend little wine event, and this quickly accelerated into we're going to buy a motel. So what was the timeline like from we're going to do this weekend to let's just buy the whole of the motel here. Yeah, so it was January. Second this was new year as a resolutions that we started the brainstorm. It was within a week that I had called up my old real estate agent and side can we go look at this motel. So middle of the winter we drove out there and so a few you know, a few weeks later, we were putting in offers it to buy a commercial property. I mean it takes maybe a month or two to really wrap up the whole process, but we moved in beginning of June. Wow, yeah, wow, yeah, you moved in the beginning of the June. That of anything to do with the name or the name is separate from when you moved in, very separate. Okay, yeah, that is a that's an intense timeline. So I want to dig into...

...the detail on the brainstorming process. So sometimes people gets hung up on the ideation process. My I don't have the right idea, I don't know how to come up with this is not big enough. So New Year's resolution came up to continue on the side hustle thing and you just committed doing brain storms. How did that work? Like? where? When? With who? Yeah, so again with my best friend April. I think it's started out over kind of juice in the morning but, as I mentioned, we really like wine. So the brainstorm just kept flowing over some wine throughout, hundreds of ideas from you know kind of a shipping wine out to people at all. We knew what one of the pillars was, I and I think that really helped. It was the thing that we are really passionate about. And then just, yeah, it was just kind of forcing ourselves to brainstorm and throw lots of ideas. And how did you capture them? Like or like? Was it at your apartment? Where did you do the brainstorming? At her apartment and then add a juice bar over the morning? Okay, yeah, this was all in one session, like one massive brainstorm. Might have been over two days, but yeah, it was. It was intense, it was lots of ideas. It was lots of kind of spinoff ideas that kind of built on one another. Cool. So couple days, hundreds of ideas. How did you start to narrow down the ones that you thought would be most interesting to work on? So I think the weekend, kind of the weekend wine camp, was a one that we really was the one of the initial brainstorm that we kind of started off with and then as we flushed that idea out and kind of, you know, thinking about all the cost thinking about all the work. That was when it was a lightbulb moment to say we should just buy it. Wow. So you jumped from running a weekend boot camp to buying the motel and clearly you had a long and experienced track record in commercial real estate. To bull from not at all. Thankfully, we found a really good lawyer who we still work with, who had a lot of corporate real estate experience and he's the one that really helped guide us through that first experience. Okay, so you at this time, still have a full time job, still have a full time job, decided to buy, took a trip down to buy the motel put together. Did you get investors or nope. So borrowed some money for a down payment and then one of the interesting things about corporate real estate and commercial real estate they didn't know is vendor take back mortgages. So we're a bank, probably wouldn't have lent us the money. It was actually the sellers of the motel, who are looking to retire, that held the mortgage on the property. Got It. And did you buy it as a business or as a real estate property? Like were they saying it puts off X and cash flow or income and you bought it as a business or yeah, we can get into that. It was called the sportsman motel. They were not doing a great business at all. So we didn't buy it based on the business that they were running, but based on the potential that we saw there. Got It and then you said, getting creative with the financing will pay you back over time as we build a business and make it successful. Yeah, so really it's like a standard mortgage that you'd have on any property, but it's with the vendors of the property and really ended up with fabulous terms that probably no bank would have ever given us. Well, awesome. Okay, so you still have a job. You find yourself being an owner of a commercial property, a motel. You took possessions. So all of the six months from I think we're going to we may end up running this weekend wine fest, Mini Festival events, to I own a motel in June. And what point did you...

...leave your fulltime job? Yeah, so I to this day, my business partner won't really let me live this one down. I I did both for a while. She moved in Solo and I would come out every weekend to work the motel. I just I wasn't in kind of a financial place to be able to quit my job right away. I needed that kind of ease into it. But that was it was. It was a really tough year. It was I'd work all day and my government job and then I'd come home and have to do all sorts of work for the motel and then every weekend I would be living in the motel. Okay, how did you even start to prioritize what to do? I mean my mind is racing with do you work on the physical look and field? You jump to the marketing? Do you like? Where did you even start with? Now we own this thing. Yeah, we what do we do? So the Sportsman Motel was a very interesting place. Catered specifically two fishermen and hunters and we had no motel experience whatsoever. And because we took a possession in June and the season is pretty short and Prince Edward County, so you're really you make your money June through September and then it kind of quiets down. So we got an education and running a motel and just ran the sportsman motel. We would check guests in, they would ask us where to go fishing. Couldn't really help them with that all that well. So I think that was important. We made a lot of mistakes and running the motel that first year. Didn't really know what we were doing, but we learned how and what was great was we also learned how, under the sportsman, which wasn't going to be the brand that we carried on afterwards, got it. So you literally just bought the property. Did you change anything out of the gate or just ran it exactly as it is? We ran it exactly as as. So we took possession at June first and we had a full House on June third. Wow. Yeah, so didn't even take your Tel Turkish towels. Didn't even move change the towels or the anything with a front desk or anything. You just took it over and ran yeah, we took it over and ran it. We did hire some staff and thankfully we hired a woman who had a bit more experience than we did. So towels we kept doing ourselves. There were a few little hotel motel tricks that she taught us. So definitely made some small process improvement and we put bucking online and listen ourselves on expedia. So we definitely and even that first year modernized the operations quite significantly. Got It. What else did you do to learn? I mean at this point there's a huge bet. You've derisked a little bit because you're working with a friend that you know and trust. Use a lot of full time job, but still a huge amount of risk. So, like, in addition to running the hotel and just learning on your own, what else did you do to try to get up to speed? Yeah, so there was a TV show called hotel impossible. That was where we learned about fifty percent of what we know about running a motel, and then I bought a like be and bees for dummies, and that is where I learned the other fifty percent. That's awesome. That is amazing, super scientific. Yeah, for sure, that is awesome. Did you did you like formalize it at all? I. Do you have like a guide and or Bible of all your learnings, or just between you and your partners? All in your head? Yeah, all on our head at the time. We are kind of formalizing it now. For sure. Got It. So getting it out of your head and getting it onto paper. How did you know that this was going to work? So really from personal experience. You that this was what was missing in the...

...region. Knew more and more people were learning about Prince Edward County, so knew that there was demand and fully designed the experience to cater to ourselves so that we knew it would be a place that we would like to stay. So I you know, there was at least an audience of two that this is going to be perfect for. Wow, that's I see many people who've done that and things have worked out well. There's some people who do something similar and don't right. So you build a product that you like, but then and then released the world and turns out that just you liked it. So what what made you believe that you were representative of like the rest of the people out there, or just, I don't know, age characteristics like you built it for you. But what if do you were the only two that hung out there? Yeah, and and we knew, even as the sportsman motel, that they were doing a good business and it was filling up. One of the other things that we kind of built our business model around was there was one other cool place that had just opened was always a hundred percent full and was going for one hundred dollars a night. So we said, okay, you know, will be the second best place to stay, knowing that they were doing well. Got It. So there was another and was the other one located in the area? Yeah, got it. Got It. So existing business that was doing okay, the sportsman other business in them was it was another motel, now another hotel, the hotel but independent. Yeah, was doing pretty well. Yeah. So you thought, worstcase scenario, even if we just make some minor improvements in the sportsman motel, this is going to still be a good thing. Yeah. So you were okay with the call it the worst case scenario, and we were yeah, okay. Where else? So you started to build what you wanted. How did you get inspiration for that? Like was it all in your head? Like where did you go to figure that out? So over the course of that first summer we started a prototype rim. It might have not been the best decision, you know, in the peak season, to take one of our rooms at a service. And a whole other thing is we did all the renovation work ourselves, which we also were, you know, had limited skills in, but we started. We found this one wall paper. We're not interior designers, but we really like interior design. And I found this one wallpaper that kind of captured the essence of what we wanted to create. So we got that on the walls. We listed that prototype rim on Airbnb just for that summer. So you have this diving motel and then you have one really beautiful rim. But that gave us an opportunity to kind of test it out, get some real people in there, get some feedback and that kind of gave us a sense of where we wanted to go. That's interesting. Interesting. So you ran most of it as the sportsman but then put some effort into making one room the way that you could potentially make the rest of the rooms. Yeah, and did you actually so, you listed it, but did you actually rent it out? Like we did stay in it the very first time? We put Sportsman Motel guests and there they feedback that we got was awful. They absolutely hated it. They missed all the old furniture and we had this you know, panicky moment of you know, did we did? We get this all wrong? But once we got ourselves on AIRBNB and we were getting kind of the target market that we were going after, they absolutely loved it. That is interesting. I wasn't thinking that. But Yeah, you've the sportsman is attracting a certain type of person, but where you wanted to go was a totally different type of person. Yeah, so how did that transition go? was there? Was it one season to the next? Or yeah, it's so really the sportsman motel we close down that fall and then it was completely rebranded for the next season. We had...

...a very few of the sportsmen guests ended up returning, partly because we are sold out and had tripled the price that we're charging as the sportsman. So it was partly a price point and partly just we are so in demand that they couldn't get in if they wanted to. Well, wow, how did you decide? That's another bold move. How did you decide to triple the price again? Just, I mean usual kind of pricing exercises, of looking to see what comparable places and the county were going for. Again, you know, pricing it to be, for your the second best place in the county. What would be affordable? Wow, these are all like simple. You say them simply, but they're hard right. These are actually all independently very hard decisions to make, for sure, and some of the decisions were ones you know we had asked other people what they thought about some of the things we're doing. One of the boldest things that we did now it's part, you know, it's iconic of the June, but we painted the doors pink on the Motel and I remember my mum just repeatedly telling me that that wasn't a good idea and that we are going to alienate, you know, potential customers. And so really it was this vision that we had and kind of sticking true to what we felt was this brand that we were creating. And now you know, you haven't stayed at the June if you haven't taken your photo in front of one of our pink doors. Right, how did you so you're making that transition from who the sportsman was for to who the June was going to be for. Did you ever document like this is who our ideal customer is, this is where they read and vacation and play, like did you document any? We actually I feel like that's one of the processes that we went through, and fairly and a fairly formal way. But again, I would say we just we were we were the target market. But yeah, it definitely kind of gave a lot of thought to who the clientele would be. So then you you took it over in June, ran it as the sportsman, you close it down for the fall. How did you then prioritize? Firstly, it's going to cause see me expensive to renovate, I would think. And then there's just so much to do in feet of snow. So how did you prioritize when to do, what to do, how to finance? There's just there's a lot. Yeah, sure, and whether or not we did things the right way hard to say. It was definitely a scramble to the very end. Again, everything we did we did on a very tight budget. We borrowed the money to do the renovations. We borrowed it through kind of a community features that's very entrepreneurial focused, and so a renovation budget was what they were willing to lend us, which meant so that was on a two hundred and fifty thousand dollar budget for the renovations and every inch of this place needed updating. So that meant we were going to do a whole lot of the work ourselves. So if you stay at the June admire the flooring, because we did all of the flooring ourselves. We painted, we wall papered, we would have these weekends where would tell our friends to come visit us wine country and then we'd assemble furniture together. So really it was getting those renovations done. So we would lay floors during the day and then once we couldn't lie flooring anymore, we kind of go into the evening and work on our systems and are marketing and all of that. So we were renovating up until the very moment that guests checked in. So fast forward. We have much better project management now, but the first time you do something, you know, you do it as best as you can and you learn things. But getting kind of really good systems and processes in place was important to us and kind of spent a lot of our...

...time there as well. And what did you do? So you got some inspiration, design things for yourself. Use the budget. The budget was what you got from the grants or sponsor to our loans. Yeah, quarter million or so. Then you had to start to drive demand. So like, oh my gosh, we bought this thing. We're totally changing the clientele. So all the people who stayed here before were going to probably not like US anymore. Like I'm over Jim, over Je. No, we need to attract a whole new clientele. Everything's on the line. What did you do to think about how to drive demand? Yeah, so luckily my business partner is kind of a marketing and public relations grew, so that was really a good find in a business partner. Things got off to maybe a slower start, but we had a very strong kind of marketing and public relations plan. So we, you know, first of all just listed ourselves on things like you could find us on expedia back then. That got some of our rooms fall if you're searching for a motel or hotel. But right from the very beginning, even when budget was incredibly tight, we hired a professional photographer who gave us great kind of assets to work with and we had a really strong instagram game right from the very beginning. That was really our main marketing tool. Was Expedia. then. I'm trying to think, but we definitely caught the eye of a lot of media and our first year actually, yeah, we again. She had a lot of great experience there. So we did. We invited media out as well as a bunch of influencers, which definitely helped to get the word out about the motel and then I don't know, it was all a whirlwind, but within a few weeks and months we had been in Toronto Life, we had vogue out, weird just it exploded. It was crazy and that was all through. Did you hire a firm to do that or those all through? That? That was us. Wow, yeah, so how did how did you know to do that or what to do or how to contact these people? So my business partners background was in public relations, so she had some good contacts. That definitely helped us get our foot and the door. But a lot of the influencers that we'd invite out would be people that we followed personally and we'd reach out. People were pretty happy to be invited for a weekend in wine country and we really meant it when we'd invite them out and which show them a really good time. They would post all about it on their own accounts and that definitely helped get the word out and helped us. We are sold out. Probably had kind of a slower first month, which we needed, but once summer hit we were a hundred percent sold out. Wow, so this sounds like this perfect story of stumbling on. You committed this New Year's resolution. You come up with some ideas, you narrow them down, you buy it, you run it, turn it over, a hundred percent occupancy. So everything went perfectly? Yeah, not, not, definitely, not perfectly. We, I mean we worked so, so hard that first year. It was April and I and a few staff who I don't know how many hours I'd be at the bar checking guests in, pouring them wine. I'm so physically it was a grueling first season, not to mention that we're also running like a motel, which is a big building with a lot of people in it. Seven and so learn, like I know more about plumbing than I ever thought I'd know, and there's a lot of processes now that we have in place that come from all the mistakes that we made. So things have gotten a lot easier. We say you can tell your after year. The way that we handle our garbage is the thing that just gets easier and easier because our systems...

...just we get smarter as we go along. And it would who does that, like, how do you where do they live? is or a is there a June handbook? Like, where do you put them all? We do actually, yeah, we now have a playbook that kind of details. This is how we do things. Got It and what what sorts of things are in your playbook? Everything from some of the things you should do when you check a guest in. What are your tasks at the end of the night, if you're working the front desk that you should do? What playlist should you put on in the morning and the evening? It's an evolving document. We've stopped printing it out because we keep kind of improving it and realizing there's things that we could use some more processes for. But yeah, there's a lot of especially now with the second property, you know, a little more standardization to the way that we're doing things, since I'm not always there in person. Got It is. So is it a Google doc? Is it a powerpoint? Like, yeah, it's a it's a Google Doc. Yeah, interesting. It's so every new employee or current employee gets access to it. Yeah, so this is part of the training for anyone working in the front of Front of House. Mostly we need a back of his playbook. On the to do list is really going through all of those sections in the playbook. Cool. So you send an advance some lessons that you learned because a handful of interesting ones here, but maybe I'll let you as there one or a few that you want to point out, like the biggest lessons that you learned along the way. Sure, good question. I think one of the ones we really believe in is do less and do it really well. We've become masters of running a motel. We know, we understand rooms, we understand our guests and checking them in, but there are times when we want to really go beyond kind of the core of our business. I remember, you know, in the very early days, I think we thought we were going to make our own shampoo and every you know, we were just going to do it all. So we've moved you know, we know the part that we are really, really good at and then we focus on building partnerships with other businesses who really, you know, they know how to make really great Champoo, for example. So how do you decide what's core and not core? Our core is the motel experience and beyond that as kind of outs out of our core. Got It? So update US then your three issues in and so this a one year as a sportsman. We're wrapping up our third season as a June motel. Great. So bring me up to speed. Where things out today? Yeah, so the biggest news was earlier this spring we purchased our second motel. One of the things we just kind of recently realized was it moost. We did it before we were fully ready to have a second property. So there's been some growing pains. But the beauty of doing it before we were fully ready meant that we also realized how we had to kind of things we had to put in place to really be capable of successfully running to June motels, just like the first one around as well, we didn't runt it under the June motel brand, so we had a kind of a season to ease ourselves in. Got It and how do you end up? How do you split time between the two? So we work on kind of what that plan looks like. Prince Edward County now is really home for me, so it's where I'll hope to spend more of my time. Set Up Solble beach so that it runs really smoothly and can be there kind of every two weeks. Perhaps we're still kind of working that out. Right now we're in project mode to get it renovated and turn it...

...into the June. So spending a lot of time in sapple beach right now. Would you have done it any differently? So you, when you were in school, had no desire to be an entrepreneur but then got the edge. If you could go back, do you wish you would have just discovered this sooner or you or there's something that you learned that you think made this more successful than it would have been without those experience? Sure, that's it. That's a tough question. I probably could have started on this venture maybe two or three years earlier, but I don't regret the years at all that I spent working for the government and doing other things. I think working in a really large organization helps you kind of understand how to build a well functioning company, even if it's on a much smaller scale. I also, I say it kind of jokingly, but I do find as kind of the role that I play and the business, I'm still working with the government at various levels on a daily basis. Yeah, something that stood out to me when you you're talking about some of the lessons that you had learned. It's about this mix of your business in your lifestyle. So how did you or did you intentionally get into this space or create this business so that your business and your lifestyle would make commingle. or I mean, were you intentional about that? If so, how? Yeah, and I think that parts still still evolving. But we make decisions based on not just what's best for the business but also what's best for our lives as well. As I've mentioned, we run a business that's literally seven. I currently live at the motel. So one of the decisions that we've made as we close over the winter, it's we leave some money on the table. But for me that was finding some balance in the business that we have so that I can be all in when we're open. The other thing was building a business in a space that I really, really love, and I truly you know, I as an entrepreneur. I find life and business are so intermingled and I'm so passionate about that. I work all the time really, but that when it's in a space that I love and working with my best friend on it, it really makes it just a great experience. So what do your your year looks roughly like going like crazy from window win and then when you're off, what do you do? Yeah, so things are changing again with the second motel. This year's going to be a little bit different. The Prince Edward County properties open from April through November. This year were really focusing on the solwill beach project over the winter. So it's nice winter kind of two purposes. One is really pushing that kind of work life balance to the life side, and then we also it's a good opportunity to kind of be reinspired. So every year we try and do an inspiration trip where we'll go, we'll travel. I mean it's really the best part of being in the travel business as I can go stay at great places and it's you know, it's business. Are you? Do you find yourself able to turn off or like, are you able to just sort of sit there and, I don't know, read and shut down, or are you looking at everything thinking, oh, idea, I need to write it down or I need to set my part or an email or yeah, while just staying at a hotel was, I like, very analytical about every single detail that's there. Now. So enjoy it, but...

...yeah, I can't. Can't turn off. Yeah, but you don't mind because you love to do it. It's fun. Yeah. So where what do you focused on? Mainly now, it sounds like getting the new property up and running. US The focus for the fall winter. That yeah, so it's going to be a really big project. We're currently in kind of the design phase of what it's all going to not look like. We're really excited this time because we've kind of planned so that we can have some contractors, so I won't be laying flooring over the winter. I'm excited about up. Yeah. Yeah, so really the focuses on that property right now. Is there anything that? So it is going to go out to a group of Ivy Alumni and beyond, other entrepreneurs. Is there anything that we can help you out with? Sure, yeah, always happy to kind of grow our community. One of the ways that we're doing that we're very, very active on instagram. There is at the June motel, but another fun one is at motelier life, so like hotel Ya but with an m and just kind of being involved in that community. We're pulling people asking for their thoughts on what we need to incorporate, coffee and room or coffee in the lobby, questions like that. So happy to have more people involved in that. Great and then, if they still happen to be in and around Prince Edward County, next season. Maybe swing by, yeah, or sable beach or saw will beach. Swing by, and chances it's the motels book early, though this has been great. Last thing I want to ask you before we wrap up. Any advice to your call it twenty twenty year old self? Think you're back, maybe third or fourth through university, probably, I don't know, maybe happy with her you're at, but also maybe nervous about what's to come or what you're going to do. Advice to your, call it twenty two year old self? Sure, I was thinking, you know, as an entrepreneur, every class that you took out Ivy would come in handy, and I do find myself on occasion being like I remember hearing about this, wish I had paid even more attention. Wish, you know, accounting very important skill to have as as an entrepreneur. So everything that you're learning and everything, whether you're ready to kind of jump right in as an entrepreneur now or if it's kind of five, ten years down the road, you're going to be learning skills that will prove useful in the future. For sure. Cool. Well, I think I got a lot out of the conversation. It's really need to hear your story retold in a different way and to get to dig into some of the details of how this actually got started. So appreciate you sitting down to spend some time. Yeah, thanks so much. You've been listening to the Ivy Entrepreneur podcast. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player or visit IV dot Ca, a forward slash entrepreneurship. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (52)