The Entrepreneur Podcast
The Entrepreneur Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

14. Looking for 'more' with Alan Gertner of Tokyo Smoke

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Why is it that people in seemingly great places — good careers or relationships, leave to pursue ‘more’?

In 2015, Alan Gertner was working his dream job at Google. Growing up, Alan was the type of kid who preferred computer camp to sports camp, and at only 30 years old was an executive at Google, living in Singapore. He’d dedicated his 20’s to winning at work and realized he wanted the next chapter to be different – so he left.

He went on to start a company in the cannabis industry, Tokyo Smoke, which he eventually sold to Canopy Growth Corporation for a reported $250M. But his systematic process to do the self-work required to figure out what to do next was key to his success.

Alan shares that process, and more on the first episode of our new series Hustle & Grit.

You're listening to the IVYENTMRENORpodcast from the Pierre L, Moriset Institute, Foronte Preneurship at theIvy Business School in this series I veentrepreneur an Ivy Faculty member.Eric Janson will anchor the session Allan thanks an Wuch Fe'r coming ingood to O, get to hang out with you again yeah thanks for having me alwaysgood to have you at the school. I wanted to spend a little F F time, sothis is part of our hustle and great series, and I wanted to spend a lot oftime today on motivation. You've got such an interesting and winding story,but I wanted to actually start with therewas an article in the TR. Ibelieve it was a Toronto Star from twenty seventeen and you were quoted awhole bunch and the title f. The article was the problem with reachingyour career goal. Can you paint us a picture for where were you at when youwere call it? Twenty five or thirty years old, pick an interesting time inyour life? Where were you at Gagan? I can reflect and and H and relate tobeing thirty B close, I'm thirty. Five now and I remember being thirty, I wasliving in Singapore. I'd been working for Google for justjust over a handfulof years. Google was in a lot of ways my dream job. I went to computer campas a kid and again I'm thirty five, so going to Gaipeter campas kid at thattime was not cool right. This was this was a Sar A. I remember my parentsactively trying to limit the amount of time I went to computer camp they'elike okay, we'll trade. You like two weeks of computer camp for four weeksof baseball camp. I I loved I loved the stuff, and I got this job at Google.Google dotcom's last jobs flid for a job got this job. At the time I movedfrom New York to San Francisco E in San Francisco, a couple of years moved toSingapore, and- and I was in Singapore and at the time I was running abusiness unit for Ghoul, and this was all I could. I eer asked for. I hadthis job with prestige. I made more money than I ever really imagined Iwould make I had a team I hav to work in MOLIPLE officers. I got to be inthis far fung place all these really amazing things- and I remember I remember sitting down with my my boss, Mi Mentorr at the time andtalking to him about what was next and thinking a lot about really my nextpromotion, because least for me a lot of what I was always motivated by why I was gettingup in the bed. The other bed every morning was to get promoted, getpromoted, make more money, lather, rints and repeat so I was having thisconversation with by Mantor and talking about the next promotion and, like Iremember very vividly explaining him why I wanted to getpromoted us askn me like w. Why? Why do you care so much when we really gotdown to it? I said that I wanted to get promoted really like to beat otherpeople to that go line and if I didn't...

...beat the other people that girline itwas irrelevant to me and when we reflectit back on how I wasfeeling in my past promotions, what I realized was really every time that Igot to that Goa line. I felt nothing and R so excited so passionate, sofocused on getting that place and then all of a sudden absence. All of a sudden. I was inlimbo again and I had to create this new goal, this new external focusis,new external simulated drive towards and ultimately at thirty. I was tiredof doing it. But what I realized was this hamster wheel. I was on wasn'tgetting me anywhere at all. I was just going to do the same thing over andover again forever, and so it started me on this journey totry to figure out what truly made my life meaningful, because if I H Dfocused my entire twenties on trying to win at work, could I focus my thirtieson trying to win at life and what would that mean? So I remember everythingabout sitting down and having that chat, and it s set me on the journey that I'mstill working on today and did your boss of the time. Did he encourage youto explore that was he thinking shout I I can't lose this guy, or was hethinking? Oh, it was so funny. So I, like, I remember, also very distinctlytalking to my boss. My boss is boss stuck into colleagues about my decisionquit when I dcided I was going to quest so I was working a google. I wentanddid a product in Gana when I came back to Singapore and and I quit my job and when I talked to I boss, my boss'sboss, Ia'll, explain to see the better way. There was basically a directrelationship between how supportive you were and how old you were, so the olderthe person was the more supportive they were of me going on this journey. Theywere immediately understadid. Oh, you want to try to figure out what wouldmake your life meet him. You want to try to take a break and take a stepback and look at all this great, like we're happy to offer you more money,we're happy to give you a different title, but if that's what you want todo go do that, but W ene. I would talk to my peers or people who were sort of fresher intoGoogle or talk to people who I didn't work with, but were maybe my friends inlife. Alloug them had a a harder time understandin it because we had all hadthis same focus. We'd all had the same perspective. We'd all had these goggleson that made. U Made US think of life in a certain way, so why would you everleave this job with this money in this place? Why would you do that? So it's so funny to think back to howuniversal it was that those who I looked up to those who I respectedthose who were older and they really and truly were all O K insupportive of Thi Sjourney that I was going to go on and do you find that was everybody else in your pure groupalso in a similar place or were there were there? Some people that had sortof got to this place and figured this out earlier was everybody just sort ofheads down. I want to win at work for...

...the Al. They were Lo onelhes figuredthis out way quicker than I did. I don't know if they went through thesame journey, it might have just been a nate for them. It might have been adiscovery they made earthere. But even now I can reflect on myfriends who maybe went and the came skibubs rightand live in Ta Ski Town and Work in a skiresort and they seem they've always seemed happier like they have lives that aremore meaninful than some of my contemporaries. Whoh've been grindedaway of work. Sometimes I would tell myself- and Ithink lots of us do this, but I would tell myself there was only one TruePath: There's only one story here that makes sense and that story is the story.I believe my owlife good work. Orcard jounyon when I started to look aroundOu Kno. It was clear that there was so much more going on, but it was hard tolook around for a lot of that time. I H 'cause, I'm basically climbing thismountain and so it' stage, one. When you look around you, you don't reallysee anything. It's not till you get to the top, but you can really look aroundand and see that there are other people on higher beacs. There are other peoplewho've taken totally different journeys. There are the people just where you areand they didn't take the same roote at all. So it took me a long time tofigure out that there were other paths and that maybe the mountain that wasclaming was a wrong wrong mountain in the first place, so that led you to a trip to Gana. Ibelieve right so I went Togana, it was actually the last project. I did aGoogle okay, so I was lucky to get to go on secomment there and we worked ona project to deploy Internet infrastructioning, Gana,Google and its infinite wisdom. Looked at the Ginay, an Margaret Thought: Heythis. You know real opportunity for us to do something here, and one thing wecan do is deploy fiber cables, so we went around gone and helped peopleunderstand how they could use google and you tub and all of these things tomake their lives better, because now they were going to have this high peeINERA and while I was was there, I had a couple moments that really pushed meover the edge in my decision making to leave Google and one of them was weereon the way this voodoo ceremony. So was me and a coupleof other Google employees googlers who were Ingana and we SF talked aboutthings we could do while we're there, and really only two of us have maybethe twenty gulsheere there had any interest in this Mooto sermony. So wefound a guide got in his car drove out to the Bush and the Brotish sermonyiesup as school write a whole different story for a whole another time, but thething that was impactle that is stuck with me is talking to the guide aboutmy life, saying that I was fenanmord from my goals that Iwas going to quit. Google misgiser couldn't believe this right, but Iasked him what motivated him in life. Why does he get up and be a gut everyday, and why does he get up and do what he does? He told me that for him, hisfocus has always been about either...

...doing something that he loves or doingsomething for the people that he loves. This. I de really stuck with me work on something that you love or workon somebody to support the people hat. You love and it's not hatsraly theprinciples that everyone should orient their life around or that I shouldorientaround, but it was. It was the submation of a journey thatwas so different that mine cause. That's not how I'd focussed my life atall Righti was going to win a work. What do I care about the other stuff soto hear someone's SUC someoch thoughtful, concise statement about howthey lived? That life really helped drive me to try to figure out this newpath so you're, starting to piece these things together, there was somblingsome sort of discomfort that you were feeling a google. You met this guideand you're, starting to say, here's a principal or an idea that gravitateswere you capturing these anywhere o? Was it just like I'm going to park thisthought I'm going to park this idea or in your mind where you like? Oh, thisis a foundation old thing that is going to be the basis of something I don'tknow what yet Howare you organizing that Invo Yeah I've always been a veryfastidious nowtaker. I try my absolute best, whether enabled by technology ornot, to write down everything in anything that is interesting to me, Eyand so I've always always done that and as I've gotten Oldr, I've goten also alot better at journalline and trying to do more freewriting ecause. I thinkit's a nice opportunity to to reflect so at this time I was really justwriting stuff, bright and stuff down, but I was still unsure of where I wasgoing to go. I was the youngest person in my my jobsback at Google in in the world right, so y part of me was still dragging meto this place of okay. Well, I should just I should really just keep on thisjourney. What happened was I I got back to Singapore. I decided I would quit and then, as I was thinking about this new journey, Iwould go on and keep it bind. I quit with no plan and Thi's, never reallymade sense to me that I would look forward to this idea ofquitting and then going in lying on a beach absence of stimulatede absence ofthings to do that didn't feel like the path tof, the dream of the vision thatI had ecause. This dream in this vision was to figure what would make my lifemore meaningful, and so for me after I quit. I startedto do a lot of reading and started to try to assemble some tools. That wouldhelp me figure. This out. Wook would make my mi life more meaningbul, andthis was after you quit after I quit. So I quit without this plan. I quit thinking that I'll figure this out. Onething: I've always told myself MSISFOR better for worse, then I'll figure itout. So I quit, I thoughti'll figure it out. I packed up my bad like packing up mybags and singae pore 'ecause. I can't stay in Singpore. I'm not fromSingapore, so quitting is also the expiration of my Viza Pacgin in my bagsin Singapore and decided on this journey. That is aheadof me and I wanted some structure. I wanted some RUBREC. I wanted some wayto be able to evaluate my life going...

...forward because I wouldn't have thesesame consistent inputs like I had before, but I needed some way to sortthrough his information, and so was someone who went to Ivy, whowas a managenen consultant who worksd at Tech Co mony for too long. I thoughtI'm sure spred. She will help me sell this problem, so I built this bigSpreche and Thi spreadsheet was my way to reflect on my happiness and themeaning in my life, and so I tried to track everything that happened to meevery day, so I'd get up in the morning and have some tea. I do some meditationand I reflect on my past day. How happy was Ihow Man Newful was my day I ha'd scored myself out of ten. Who did I talk to what a they talkd Iabout what was the weather like? What do I do, tri to write all these thingsdown and I went out and lived this life that I hadn't otherwise got to live.'cause I'd been working, so I got the chance to go and be a back country,skitoer God in Japan, I'd love skiins one of those moments where I feel andflow ere I feel like my life has meaning I gout to ski, my friends and Iwe bought a twenty year old Tiora and we drove from London to Mongolia. I got to go. Do all this stuff and allthis time, I'm filling this perjue every morning, Golit out and after notthat long. I started to discover a pattern and it taught me two principlesthat were the guiding light of the next phase of my life. These to things I don't think they'renecessarily so revolatory, but they were important for me to see in themirror to see that they were true. For me, one of those things was that mylife is more filling. I am happier if I am part of or building a community and,as I said, this is think in some ways. A pretty obvious thing: There's lots ofstudies around human happiness. That say one of the most fundamental inputsto your happiness is time with your friends time with your family time withlove ones, social time and I'd spend my life trying to win work. So after Ileft IV, I lived in New York, I lived in San Francisco, I lived in Singapore,I lived in Bankak Livtogyo and I liv Aga doesn't sound like necessarily thetrappings of a person who optimized for community. So I know community is important to me. The second thing I learned was that my life is more fulfilling more meaningful if Itake on a big chalnge or to steal from Google's parlence. If I take on a moonshop, if I focus my energy in trying to imagine a world that I want to live inas opposed to the world I live in today, and this isn't necessarily five percentbetter or ten percent better. It's not about running a marathon faster than Itipically Wul run a marathon. It's instead about some large scale, hardthing, tbout pushing a boulder up a hill.

I focuse my energy on those kinds ofthings. My life feels more fulfilling. It feels like I'm, making t edifference, and so I had these two angors now I want to depart of Er build the community and Iwant to take on AMUCHAP and those two came out of all of the new experiencesin a lot of the tracking that you did like did you? Did you see somehow,through the patterns of your data, that the days that you were happiness hadhappiest had something to do with those things? Yes, like I remember when wewere schemes, I'm working as a backangry ski to e guide. We lose agroup we're in the forest in the middle of noere in Japan, and we lose a groupof people like not a good senario right and if it's not otherwise abundantlyclear, I don't speak Japanese, so you know other than alerting the nearbystaff that we've lost a group. It's not all I can do is the the key interpreter.We didn't lose my group to be far. We lost a group, so we find this group SOSmyself and three four other guides and were doing our absolutel best t tryingto call them. Obviously we can't get a hold for them they're with our guides, so we knowthey're at least with somebody, and we end up. You know said at thisbig parimeter n searching the forest it to five pm at six PM at seven PM andskene Juban is cold right. Your mine is twenty mineos thirty son is going down,is not a it's, not a good good look. Finally, we get hold of the guide likecrackling phone call. We have this. You know big printed map out Wer, look atthe epography of the area, we're pretty sure where he's going topop out of this gully. It turns out they went into this gully that theyobviously can't get out of so a couple of us get in a car. Wedrive an hour and a half away start climbing up the sale, hoping thatthey're going to comeout of this gally and we find them. May We find them atnine pm, it'so wholly stressful terrifying, uncomfortable situation. We get everyone together, going Ou havea nice dinner. Maybe e have some warm ramen and drinks to beers and weflect on the day and promise thatwe'll never lose them again. But when I woke up the next day- and I I filledout my my spreachee- what I notice was as silly as this might sound. My lifefelt very meaninful in that mot, like I got the chance to participate insomething that was truly hard to participate in something that was aboutcommitting about. You know the scripibual that I d spent weeks withthat I cared about to work with guides and we worketogether as a team to do all this stuff so thes. You know small anecdote of thekind of story that led to a score being higherone day, and so I would see these patterns when these things would happenand because I also took notes right, it was a journal and a Asprenchi. It waseasy to start to see these inputs that...

...drove this feeling. This desire forcommunity this desire to take on big challenge, but had you not givenyourself the time to reflect in the space toactually live? Those experiences mean you ma. Maybe you did experience, dothings like that before, but hadn't, given yourself the space or time toreflect on it, so only by giving yourself the headspace to do that. Wereyou actually having these these insits of these realizations? I think that'strue, and I think it was important for me, given my makeup, to be able to seeit in the mirror. As I said earlier, it's one thing for me to read abusiness book or a book about improving my life. That tells me these to thingsI suspect there are lots of other people that have come to at inside. Anymore btwhat was truly helpful for me was to be confronted with that, and Iwas confronted with this idea that these are the thing ihave an obviouschoicher. I can. I can take this information that I've been writing downwhile I've been living my life and do something about it or I can not it'slike a an extreme version of you know these strength, assessments that Piazsahave or you can sit down. You could sit down in your office and say like whatbrings me energy. What drains me energy? What am I good at? What am I not goodat I do every year I look at my calendar and I look at what were thethings that I did either meetings that I take. What travellingdid I do and looking at them? I can almost get him an emotional response to,like I remember when I got on that flight and did that like I need to doless of that this year, so just to to jump in really quick. One thing I'vebeen working on since I I left my job in this past February, an th thusandnineteen was this idea of the full body. Yes, it's actually the fullbody F, Yes,but I'm not going to swear so t the full body. Yes right, NSO. This idea offullbody e reason I bring it up is. I think it relates very well to thatfeeling, youre expressing right, I'm like Oh, it's like you know that wasjust ot good experience, sometimes for me and my life, I've always looked atthings with my brain first, I want to look at these problems and thescenaries that I'm an eflect back with my brain, and that's only really onepart of how our body thinks we havennaurons inour gut and our heart, a t plays a hugely meaningfor role in the way thatwe think in the way that eact. So this idea of the full body, yes, is tryingto reflect on and trying to tap into understanding how you get reacts tothings now, your heart reacton things, because that feeling like. Oh that's,not a bad feeling, Rightyou posture, even changes when you make that makethat feeling and so better understanding this this. This full body,yes, has been very important in you know this next journey that I'm on totry to understand. Okay, what really gives me anergy? I can have some baseprinciples in place, but I Wana understand what gives me energy and Ithink to go through that exercise. An my estimation for me at this point. Inmy journey. It's not just about my head,...

...that's sort of been the next part of myunderstanding of myself. It's actually about my heads about my hearts by myguts, but my my whole self, and trying to figure out how to see the signalsfrom I got in my heart, because I feel, like I've been trained only to see thesignals from my head right, so we haven't even talked about where it ledyou. I mean probably typically start some of these conversations with h previous roles ind what you'de mostrecently done, but I I wanted to dig into how you made that transition,because I mean you've done some phenomenal things since leaving Google,but they to do that self work to put yourself ina position to go without really knowing what the next thing was. I mean,frankly, a lot of the other guests that we have onand there's stories of howthey mitigated the risk, how they starteed as a side hustle one foot inone world, one foot on the other, or they mitigated the risk by finding theright founding partner and drisking. The team yougare o people, much smarterthan I am y suspect yours is totally totally different Um. So ' justreemphasizing to me, like Gosh everybody's journey, is just so totallydifferent. Fosr, though I will say part of my understanding of my life is thateverything I will evergo through someone else has already gone throughmean ever feeling I'll have and every success will have in every failure.Someone else has gone toh that- and it's been very important for me to try to find those people and try toread and learn fomall the experience that have happened before me, so you ended up doing that self work. You didend up, I'm paraphrasing hugely because I know there's a massive bar of thestory here, but you ended up in the CANAPAS space. There's a a massivestory in between that. A lot of other people have touched on an previousinterviews, so google, Allan, Girtner and y'll you'll see the full story, butthe story of founding. Really you had this bold. You created this vision andI love the way that you prase it to me in the past. was you envisioned a worldwhare cannabis was going to be, it was goingto grow. There was an opportunity or a moment in the Canada seased, thankgoodness at least for now, and you knew that retail was going to be a part ofit. You knew bran was going to be a part of it, and so you positioneyourself, nice and early as a brand in the space, then went on to found acompany called Tokyo smoke which eventually you when did you you sold itto canopyw sold it a canopy. The deal closed September, two thousandeighteen, so basically a year now, okay, so sold it for healthy sum, ewent on tobecome the chief retail officer of canopy growth, Corporation yeah, andthen you left yeah. Can you help me understand again, because thisis like okay, Alan has done his...

...exploring. He knows what's important,he's done this self work and now it's like B, surely now, there's smoothsailing and everything he'll just be the head of retail, of the biggestcannabis company in this exploding industry and yet a few months, and youended up leaving so it. It didn't. Surprise me, but helped me understandthat thought process for why you left again. WOR ICHKNOLEDGAN I've been verylucky on this journey. We had as specific thesis of our business, andyou know we worked very hard, but a lot of things fell our way and in September,cant be close on buying our business and Cannibe as sort of mentioned as thelargest Cannibotis company in the World Ho discopanty that Canada, Birth Wich,is truly unbelievable upwards. At some point of a thirty forty billion dollarcompany, we were incredibly lucky to be comepart of that business. I was began the chief retail officer and spent justover half a year working there. I think a big part of why I left was going through a similar process ofreflecting that I went through a couple of years ago an a couple of exercisesthat were very helpful for me, not so dissimilar from the wisdom I hade gotomomentor in the past or the spretched dia belt, to start to focus mydirection. One of the things I remember doing inthe past couple of months was sitting down o the Spirtu again and woric onthe past five years of my life. How I feel today and how I want to feel infive years, and if you imagine that there are ten twenty twelve you onumber of parts that are drivers to the make up of a person. Maybe it'syour emotional entergy or your spiritual energy. Maybe it's yourfinancial independence, Youre Living Environment, N News Score. Those things!Oh scored these things out of ten. I clue like scores on a ten and SPRETCIT,so I scored all these things. I score all these. An five years ago, before Iwent on this journey, I scored all these things today. This is you kN inJanuary. This past year, maybe December last year- and I square all thesethings figers now and each time, I'm writing to try to explain thedifference right. Why scoring from eight or why do I remember my financialindependence feeling like an eight five years ago? What was funny about going through thatexercise? Was You ad all this thingap? So let's imagine its ten things inatten, so the scores out of a hundred my score went down relative to fiveyears ago. What scouldn't couldn't even believe it, butpart of why that was a very useful exercise for me was Bin recognizingthings that I knew whithat. Maybe my financial independence went from aneight O or nine. It's not like. I felt constrained in the first place. I'venever wanted to buy a forary anyways. These are not the drivers of myhappiness, an my motivation and there's so many studies out there that saymoney beyond a certain level inhibits your happiness anyway, and these other things may be myemotional energy.

My score had gone way down because Ihad got back into the routine of trying to woin aware, but I did we built this business. I putmy head down an. I worked, my super power or place. The supowerthat I'm most in touch with is that I have no Vummo. I, as a personput me in a dark room, give me a product to work on I'm there and sothat three four years it disappeared. Because I worked and I was focused onour vision. I was fokes on our purpose and I believed in our purpose, maybeunlike before I had this purpose- that I believed him and we were truly doingthis thing. I believed in this big challenge at was about community. Ibelieved in it, but when it came down to it, I still ignored the seven other partsof my person or eight o ther parts or twenty other parts or whatever it was,and so my score was down and looking at that, I again had thismoment w ve a choicer. I can do something about this or I cannot and unlike in some ways, other parts ofmy life. I have no excuses now, ive ticked those boxes that I wanted totick. I put that money in my pocket, and so I have to really in in this scenario. Ihave to really really look at myself in the mirror andsay I'm not going to do anything about this. Just 'cause. I don't want to that'sjust not who I am so. It was another chance to go on ajourney of discovery, to try to figure out who who I wan to be for the rest of my lifeor at least the next phase of my life, and to do the work. So do you have you've been through thistransition? O Fewti, huge transitions, for you say money, wasn't a huge motivator yNTHERE's like this level of enough, and then you get rong enough and thenanything more. You said it went from an eight to on nine, didn't, usuallychange anything no totally, and I don't think that's unique to me at all. You know e one, one of the most amazingthings about being part of ibeing graduating on thise places. You knowthe Worlds You'r oyster in some ways and I think very quickly. You discoverthat all F, these challenges that you thought were ahead of you terms ofmaking your life work a lot of them. You would chieve pretty quickly ye h. So what work do you recommend twenty somethings due now or whatadvice do you have because is it? Is it you know what for the first ten years,you just need to put your head down and do the work first or is it? Do the selfwork before you put your head down and do the Work Yeah Goodu One? I generallydon't have any advice, 'cause I'd like I don't know right and, as I said earlier, and I blieve it, Ihave wor R, but I also got very very lucky. What I can say is the self reflection understandingyourself being willing to look yourself in themirror and acknowledge your flaws, acknowledge the part aboutyou that you don't like the part you do like...

...one way or another you're stuck withyourself, so you can layer on all these distractions, which I have been someonewho has done. I've lared all of these goals on top of myself, so I couldfocus on those goals and not focus on me and in in my journey those problemsthat suffering it's gotten harder to deal with, not easier as I've, goten,older and so 's. I'm incredibly grateful that I get to go through thisjourney now 'cause. There are lots of people who go through this journey whenthey retire. I'm grateful I get to do this now, but I also will recognize Ifor myself. Hopefully this is helpful for others. I don't think I needed to not have ajob to quit any of those things to go through this journey. There are lots ofbitesize ways to do reflection to do the work, to understand yourself towork through that suffering that exists with all of us that I could have donealong the way as opposed to having to having to confront such an abruptchange. I'm lucky with the journey I've been on very happy to be in the place.I am, but I recognized tha I could have done those things. A maybe would havemade my journey different, Myeah I', like that you recognize in thebeginning. I this some, I don't forget who said it, but never speak fromadvice, only speak from experience, so appreciate that your bring your ownexperience t it's hard Odea of a generican vice etealy enclosing here.Is there anything Um? What do you focused on now? Do you know? What's next you've done some of this you'vedone Thi selfwork. Do you know what's next in the chapter or is it still tbdh? I on I recognize I iave lots to sell fory Lefe to do N. I think that will bea journey. I will be on my whole life in terms of what's next. For me admit I don't I don't know exactly yetWen I've started tho narrowing on is a bit of a better understanding of whatmy purpose is. I don't know if this will be the purpose of my whole life,but my purpose today and I've started to refine this idea with time that whata big part of what drives me and the difference, I think I can make givenwho I am SA D- I want to help bring new perspective or bringperspective to people's lives. That's a big part of why I was alwaysexcited about working at Google and this company that Wei could bringinformation, bring ideas to people all over the world to try to helptemocratize information in a way that could and did change the world. Part ofwhy I love working in Cannabas was it's and incredibly safe and cheap doorwayto a new perspective, not saying as perfectly safe but relative and as I'vegotten older, and I have more time on of the things that give me energyunderstanding, the world of meditation and sound baths and hootropic breathing, and all of thesethings that fascinate me a big part of why the give in en te Fastat Meis,because I think they can help us understand ourselves in the worldbetter...

...and I think in some ways more than anyother time. We live in the time where we arebecoming more miopic and if I can try to bring perspective to people to theworld in some way, and I would be honored for that to be the purpose ofthe next phase of my life. That's great! Well, I wantto thank you for sittingdown and spending the time and H if you, if you've, got a filter now for thethings that you say ha guessed to the fact that you made the trip in theresitting here to have this conversation. It means that it's important to you andit's really important to meansi. I appreciate you making the TIMEIT's mysledger. Thank that me. You've been listening to the Iviongminor potcast toensure that you never miss an episode subscribe to the show in your favoritepodcast player, or visit Ivi dotca forward, slash entrcrenership. Thankyou so much for listening until next time.

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