The Entrepreneur Podcast
The Entrepreneur Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

25. Authenticity: How to be unapologetically you and carve your own path with Josh Domingues, Founder & CEO of Flashfood

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Flashfood has become well known across North America as a grocery app that helps you save money and reduce food waste. With massive grocery partners like Loblaws, Farm Boy and Meijer, Flashfood is quickly becoming a household name.

All too often, entrepreneurial success stories skip the messy middle: the details, mis-steps and failures along the way to their ultimate success - in this episode Josh Domingues, Founder & CEO of Flashfood spares no details.

With specific examples from early failures, to conducting interviews with early users, and rolling up his sleeves to generate his first sales, Josh highlights how authenticity is a competitive advantage for entrepreneurs.

You're listening to the IVIONTPRERNERpodcast from the Pierre L, Morriset Institute, Foronte Preneurship at theIvy Business School in this series, Iventrepreneur an Ivy Faculty member,Eric Janson- will anchor the session here with Jostemingez from Flash FoodJosh thanks for making the time brother Yeah thanks for having me this is it'sawesome. Appreciate you coming in to share the story Yeplucky that I didn'tget caught in the snow or there's not bad weather, for the driv great weather,for a tagown from Toronto. Exactly I wan to rewind the tape back. Were you?Where did entrepreneurship come from? Were parents grandparents, friends like?Where did you get the bug, so both of my parents started a lawn sprinklercompany together. My Dad was an immigrant from Portugal and my mom wasfrom New Brunswick and my dad started working in the urigation business, andthen he ended up leaving one of his bosses and starting the company with mymom. So my whole life growing up o the table. Everything was around the familybusiness like that's all they were talking about. For the most part, I'vegot three other siblings. So there's four of us and the third child and tome I played hockey at a high level, and Iknew that whenever hockey was done, I was going to do something for myself.So I always thought like There'ud be a couple of years: Whene, I'm basicallyin training of like learning how other people deal with business or or different things in life and theneventually like starting my own thing. So did you work for the family,business gowing up or I work? I worked one day when I was fourteen, and then Iretired, my dad told me to put like these flags that you see on irrigationsites. He told me to put them in a straight line for like a hundred metersand then so I put him down then my dad comes back and he starts yelling at me.'s like what are you doing, I'm like? What do you mean? I put flags down fora hundred meter she's like they're all crooked, so he walks through and likereorgs all the flags and I'm like. Okay, that's it! I retire like I'm going playhockey you're done yeah. So then, I just worked AP like hockey camps afterthat, and my two older brothers and my younger sister are all in the familybusiness now so h. It definitely was in your family and I was going to bring upso you it's funny in doing some research here I ve found a pressrelease when the BRANTFORD blast, resigne Wright, Wingor Josamingays, tobring some added toughness and grit to the right wing. So do you think thatpart of your experience playing competitive hockey led to you becomingan entrepreneur, help you be an entrepreneur in anyway? It's it's sowild, so I played in the O Chel I playd for Oen Sound, so I played at the Calabad center, which I think is called something different now, but why wiseryeah so like ten thousand fans like and when I was in junior, I wasn't goodenough to just be a skill guy. So I'd have to fight sometimes and do like allthe gruntwork that, like you'd, have to do in hockey to try and get yourselfnoticed, and there is no more risky scenario, then being in front of fiveor ten thousand fans that are screaming, and you drop your gloves and you squareoff with someone at centerize, because there's so many different dynamics thatcome into play. You have like the fear of getting hit in the face and likebleeding or like breaking your nose like physical injury, you have the fearof making a mistake and then your teammates will laughy you. You have thefearle crowd laughing at you, and then you also have the fear of not beinggood enough to stay at this level. So you are when you get in a scenario likethat, you are completely vulnerable and when I was coming up Tho a junior likeyou tube, was a thing too. So I'm like, Oh my God, like if I don't do well andlike a fight, then I'm like so many bad things will happen fromthat. So that was one thing. A D like I thoughta couple of times. I wasn't like the the toughest guy, but also just beingin shape, eating the right things: Training h the right way sleepingproperly at a really young age. I was doing that like very strictly so thosethings now that I look back on so th e, there's those things and then the mostimportant aspect for me was being a teammate, so I always hade aleadershiprole and a lot of teams that I was on and for me being Kinda like a midtal, a packplayer on my team, I had to be a good guy in the dressingroom people had tolike me. It was something that I had to do to stay at a high level and you canpick people that are not good people off really quickly on a team and thatskillsaid has helped me immensely now as a se over start up like when peoplecome in, I coand see through people pretty quickly if there's EGO or ifthey're treaty me differently. Th they're treating other people like alot of things, don't go on notice and that'. T skul said that I have that I'mfortune Ar for and it came for playing a team sport. My whole life. So judgingsay, that's a super power like being able to judge someone's character owhat they're really like quickly. I would say it's l, maybe yes, but alsolike, if you're not sure, being able to get to the bottom of it relativelyquickly. So if I have like an inkling,...

I'm not like I'm, not stubborn or likearrogant enough to be like. Oh, this is how this person is, but I'm intelligentenough to be like I gotta like ask a couple, different questions and see howthis person is in different elements. So not being not being afraid toactually ask the tough questions to fiurew. People are actually likeexactly interesting. Your second point, the selth care one. I find reallyinteresting because a lot of people we've had a lot of guests on to talkabout sort of being younger, graduating from school and then starting theirfirst thing. I feel, like people forget self care for like five to ten yearsand then maybe realize it again once they come out on the other side of astartup or something and I've. I've had a lot of friends that played in theOgel and I feel, like you, learn really early. The benefit of habits like likeleading indicators that are going to eventually lead to something better andself care like. If you don't get the right recovery, sleep diet, then youprobably feel it on the ice so things that people maybe don't learn for tenyears when they were anotrepreneur that you learn pretty early inmpetitivesports. You also learn how it affects your performance. I mean, like you, didcross it competitively and were a serious athlete like you'd know, you know going into a gym or going intocompetition or going into work if, like you've, caut corners and as soon as youlike, get into that routine and you're not performing like you like, youshould be you'r like jeeze like I could have just like, not had a big Makyesterday or like any little thing like for people that are really selfawareyou're honest with yourself and yeah. I mean like. I got fat after school, Iplay Hockey University and then, after that, like I worked on BAS STREEM for acouple of years. I I got fat and then it was really difficult to get backinto shape. And now I just turned thirty not long ago and I'm doing morereading than I ever have on Diet, and I always told myself what I was playingthat when I was Dun playing I'd, be in the best shade of my life, because Iwouldn't have to spend two hours a day on the ice. Not wasn't the case, butnow being thirty versus being in my teens or in my early twenties, it wasmore difficult to get back into shape, but I'm way more aware of like eatingand the things you have to eat and the way that you're eating and like whatthat Juest, your body and I see what how it does to me like from a businessperspective. So I mean like this week, for example, I'm typically doing likeOl mad now so one meal a day, so I fast the whole day and I just eat dinner andthen, when I kind o like fall out of Wack I'll, do a forty inght hour fast.So just this week I had dinner on Sundaynight and then I didn't eat againuntil Tuesday, like three hours before a meeting with a big grocer in Dallas,and it's actually easier to do that when you're traveling, because, likeyou're just in an airport anyway like have a couple of Soda Waters Anyway,like I cal, bore you but yeah to me now there's another thing. Here too, I metwith a fander the other day, who's. Twenty four and really successful,really impressive company, just raise a lot of money. Like he's reallyintellectual- and I was sitting across with him and he's like talking aboutthe grind and talking about like being in it and he's like I put on way likeI've, got to like try and think about like how I'm carrying my body from nowon, but, like I work so much, and I actually think that you get a higherreturn on your time at work. If you focus on yourself first- and I thinkthat's true of our company, like I think it's more important to put peoplein front of what you're doing and the output is far more superior over a longamount of time. So I'm now four years into our business and like we'll go onthe early story, but I don't feel like I don't feel like. I have to get to anend. I don't feel like. Oh my God, I'm drowning. I like what I'm doing. I,like the people that I'm doing it with because of my background being on ateam and we focus on our cells before we focus on work or whatever, and thatmakes a big difference. I think that's great. I teach a class here calledhustland Grit and the Hustle and great couruse. I think we we spend a lot oftime in. I don't know education talking about the nuts and bolts of start ups.How do you come up with an idea raise money pitch? You know those sorts ofthings hustle and grits about the person like self care and mental health,and what motivates you and those sorts of things so cool to hear you talkabout that like you're running a marathon but you're going to be able todo it because you're going about it the right way: SMART, SMART YEAH! I meanlike we'll, see it's it's going well right now it could ere good blow up atany time like but yeah I mean like, I feel, confirdent about it and andyou're right, like the other thing too, is when you challenge yourselfphysically, you get more confident mentally. So when things go sideways orlike Challenges Arise in the business, if I'm consistantly challenging myselfphysically, I feel better to handle those things that happend with thebusiness yeah. No doubt so you ad you, you played competitivehockey. Then you worked on base street for a bit, so you were InvestmentAdvisor Management Consultants. I saw that you deded some time working atsage, I think with pro athletes yeah.

So what was that phase? You had thisentrepreneurial in cling, but you WHA ignored it, put it off for a few yearsor yeah, because I was only exposed to a small family B, t small familybusiness, but a family business, my whole life and then I think I was the only one in my familyto Graduate University, which was funny 'cause. I was like Byfar the dumbestout of my siblings and, like I mean that not like self deprecating like ifyou looked at grades and transcripts like I was the worst student but didwell in school and didn't know what I wanted to do. But when I got to schoolI realize that, like okay, I'm not going to plain the Anojell, probablynot having Goin to play Pearl hockey like. I don't really want to go likethe minor leagues and Grind it out. So I had really good grades. Theuniversity came out of school started on Bay Street as an investment advisor.So I basically worked on a team. I was cold calling for one of the biggest oneof the biggest hurin sales sals right out. F, the Oi Yeah, like legitimately,like two hundred dollars a day, weere calling small business owners andtrying to convince than they give us their personal savings. So first youtry an book a meting. Then you go through the whole process and Icouldn't be doing what I'm doing if it wasn't for that sales experience and itwas like a boiler room style work and during that time, while I was doing it,I got accepted to law school. So I had applied- and I hadn't heard back yet-and everybody rejected me, but Ottawa and Ottowa finally accepted me. So Iwent to my boss, the time and they had a traning program for people to go inand build their own book a business, and there were targets associated withthat. So I went in, I said lock like to say, Muster White, I said Towight Igone to law school, I'm either going to go to law school or I want to do thison my own. I don't want to work for you anymore and he's like okay, here's yourtargets. It was like August when I got in, and I had to decide by the end ofthe month and November- was the next training program so he's like here'syour targets. If you hit them, you can go in the next training program. You'llbe the youngest person who's done it like gone in that early, like, I, don'tthink, you're ready. I don't even think you'd be ready. If you had thesetargets but like it is what it is, I'm like. Okay, so I hit the targets gonein the training program. Did it for about a year and was L ke building myown book of business, and I remember we had a sales coat who came in every twoweeks. He was like this seven year old guy who, like did not take care ofhimself and no matter whether youere doing well or horrible. He would tellyou how bad you were doing and it's like this is so ineffective, likeyou're, not coaching me you're, just literally ever two weeks telling me thesame thing, so I remember coming out of that meeting and like looking around atsome of the other brokers in the office who are like in their fifties orsixties, and these people are bringing in like they're, making personallynorth of a million dollars a year and they're all miserable, and I rememberlike coming out of thes sales meeting where the sales coach is telling melike how useless I am essentially and he's telling me to be like these otherpeople, and I look around t the other people. A'd like these people are nothappy. So I'm like, okay, like I'm young in my career, like I don't wantto be doing this, so I left that and I started management consulting because afriend was there: they they got me a job and there I learned basically likeprocess engineering, so it was- and this is valuable I think- for thelistener base. But it was a company called Carpedia International, they're,baseen of Oquville, and they work with companies mainly like operatingcompanies and the projects are typically longer. But let's say it's athree month project. So your first month you get dropped in you spend timewith everybody in the business and you take down what they're doing and thenyou separate all of their time by green time or red time. Greed time is valueat it. Red Time is nonvalue at it and then the second month, and then youfind out how much the average person makes d you find out what the loss isfrom red time. The second month you work with those same people that you'eworkd it for that work at these companies and you figure out why theyhandle this red time. Like what were the blocks for them and their companies-and you come up with strategies to implement in then the third month, youimplement those strategies and you tie it back to the Ry and you actually showthe savings, so the projects were longer than three months but likethat's how how they worked, and I did that for about a year and a half inthree different projects that I'm like. Okay, I've learned how this works like.I don't want to stay here forever and then my old agent playing hockey was apretty prominent and lagent still is and we sat down- and we were just liketalking about whatever and heas like listen. We have some of our youngclients in this family office that manages money for the NYCHEL playerslike. Would you want to come on and do that? We don't have anybody running it,so I did that for a year and a half, we had six guys that Werein achild playersand I was basically flying around North America meeting with NL players more orless like getin the beside papers and like don't buy these stupid things, butthat was really fascinating because you saw the difference between like somepeople who came up with money, some people who cared about money a lot,some people who didn't care about money and you could start to see it an earlyage. What that does to a person what that does to a family for people thatlike dealt with it intelligently and people that didn't so. That was reallyeyeopening too and then from there. I laft and started flash food feel likeyou've, had some really interesting like key learnings from each of those.It was like...

...sales in the beginning process andeliminating you know, unnot useful time so working supereffectively and thenlike this grown up inside of like the way that money impacts, people ateither posibly or negatively slike big takeaways from each of those threeexperiences. I think what people specifically people that arecoming out of school are not open like it's, so cooky cut o right. Like youcome out of school, you take a job for two years and then you try and get anMBA program, and then you go into debt even further, and then you come out andyou're like now you're making like between a hundred and a hundred thirty,depending whether you're in banking or consulting, which is generally whereyou get filled hert into and you get caught in this loop, where you neverhave the opportunity to be creative, and so I would ave loved to be in thatloop at the time. But I didn't get acceptd to the right schools. Well,like the school that I went to was a good hockey school. I want to sayMary's and Healthax, but it was so far away that, like I couldn't layin a goodconsulting job and like I wouldn't get and do a good MBA, because I didn'thave that background. So I didn't have the opportunity to like go that routeand I couldn't make my way into investment bank. If so, I started as abroker, which was sales and what I did when I realized that I didn't want tobe an investment like an t e investment advisor was. I was like okay, like whatam I learning from this? What can I take from this? And how can I get moreseasoned? So to me, it didn't matter how long I stayed somewhere for me. Itwas like once I feel, like I've learned enough, and I don't want to go deeperat this job move on to the next one, and I didn't care about the obtects ofthat and what it would look like in a in a laten profile or a resume, becausewhen I sit across with somebody, who's, intelligent and they're thinking abouthiring me or not, I could communicate it that way and they're like all rightlike this, is somebody that we can trust. That's relatively intelligentand that's what I found at your story that, like the way that you tell thestory, makes logical sense MHM. So then you left and flash food came right after so you leftto start flash food or you left. Did you get it on the rails? While you werestill working or did you quit and then the idea happened yeah. The idea happened. So when I left th when I left BEMOinitially before I became a consultant, I wanted to start a company that was arobo adviser, so the same thing as well: simple. There 's a couple of companiesdoing in the states at the time and to me it was like this is just so obvious,so I tried to bootstrap and like hire international developers and get aproduct built and couldn't 'cause. I didn't know what I was doing whilesumple raises money and then, like I end up getting disinterested, I go toconsulting whatever. So when I was still at sage in the family office, theBank of Scotland fired two hundred and fifty their financial advisers andeverybody who had less than two hundred thousand dollars of assets in the banknow got rolled into their proprietary Robo adviseor, which was like just afinancial service platform, and I was like okay, like I couldn't execute, butlike the vision that I had and like the market that I was thinking of ismaturing in front of my eyes like well simple, just raised a bunch of moneyfrom powercorp like this is a thing, so I told myself the next time I get likethis kind of feeling, I'm just going full tilting to it, and the story withFlash Food is. My sister was a chef. She gave me a call after a cateringevent and she was like I just threw it four thousand dollars worth of food. Istarted laughing, I'm like you're, an idiot. Why would you do that? She's,like no? This feeling sucks, like my boss, was overtopped my shoulder andlike basically yelling at me to throw it out like I feel horrible. So Icalmed her down for the next fwe days. I started reading about food waste andwhat I learned is when food gets thrown out most times it ends up in a landfillgets covered by their garbage and when it rots it doesn't have any oxygen thatproduces methan gas. So the statistic is: If international food ways were acountry, it'd be the third leading cause of greenhous gas emission behindthe? U S and China, so it's not cars and fateries it's food and there's somany people that are hungry. So that was like the problem that I learned andat the time I lived in downtown Toronto on top of a grocery store, and I had tofigure out two things like naturally h. These groceres can't be sellingeverything in their stores like there's no way so I had to figure out how muchfood they throw it every day and what's the lead time from the time they throwit out till a Sel by date. 'cause then you got to think like. Is there even anopportunity here and what I learned was the averagestore throws out like between five and ten thousand dollars worth of foodevery day, and it's anywhere from two or three days, O, sometimes weeksbefore the cellby date. If you think about Thanksgiving the next dayChristmas h next day, Halloween the next day, like all that food generallyis getting tossed and then it's not just a grocer problem. It's a consumerproblem like when you and I go shopping and if we're going for chicken breastwe're reaching at the back for whatever has long a shelf life all the near day,the stuff moves to the front and the Groceres have to pull that, becausepeople won't take it and on the flipside. If we go buy a watermelon andthere's only one there as consumers, we assume it's the worst one, so they haveto overstop the shelves and if they wanted to get rid of all that food...

...and donate it all of it. It's logistics, that's a challenge whopicks it up. WHO DROPS IT OFF? Who pays the price and who guarantees the safety?So all of these thigs combine I'm sitting an my Cono and I'm like Jeez.If there's a way for this store to mark the price of the food down, I could seethe deal through my phone pay through my phone and pick it up in the storethe same day. People Wil Chop like that all the timeand that's exactly what we built. We took the discount food rack, Mata Ixexy,put on your cellphone and there was like a whole bunch of stuff really like,as we talk about my background, like thin consulting aspect of my background, going into likeunderstanding process and how to work with people to create new things andstrategies and tie back to the financials like that experience, atecarpedia was the most invaluable that I've had because learning how to cutthrough an organization and like change manage people. We couldn't be doingwhat we were doing if it wasn't for that. Perhaps you prov out some of this,so you said a couple of things here, so you first said the experience of H.Having missed out on the ROABOA advisor thing was, like you felt the pain ofnot acting. You kind of acted. I E money to have something developed, butdidn't take it far enough yeah. So you were looking like you were activelylooking for the next gg. You had primed yourself to look for the next thing, soyou were ready. You had the pain of bissing out on the other one, so you were looking and you were ready toact on the next thing and the next thing you said I'm gon NA whatever itis. If I e El o I'm going to do it so then found the thing you said you hadto prove two things that the Delta between the Cellby Dade and thethrowout date was there's enough of a window to actually so. How did youprove that out? I talked to people at the stores. I went to like a wholebunch of stores. Talk to everybody like me, managers, people in like the deliddepartments, like I talk to everybody in stores and they're the ones who toldme the volume they're, the ones h told me like the time like there's. Noresearch on this stuff, like grocers, never want to get out this kind of data,so I just had to talk to people on the ground. Thinking, like my dad's, beenin the grocery industry for probably thirty years, made more since highschool and uh yeah, he he'll talk to he coan talk to God, Love Hem, talk to alamp shade for half an hour. You know he's just he'll talk, he loves Tahawk,and so, if you went in his store and asked him hat like how much produce hes, he'd know the numbers like that, so you just walked in there a D startedtalking to people, yeah, yeah, yeah, a whole bunch of them, not downloadingmarket research, Ror pords googling, you actually wentnt and Talkd to realpeople. These groceries, like weren't, even tracking, like they weren't, even tracking, howmuch food they were, throwing? U, for the most part like they had, they werejust starting to try and figure it out. 'cause, it's been a cost of doingbusiness F for so long, so even that in of itself I was like. Oh, my gosh likethis is such an inefficiency but yeah. Just talk to people like I get outsideof the building. Go Talk to me exactly okay. So why won't Wa? When I was a student, Ishopped a Lalawas is the closest thing chopped at Lablas. They would slap thefifty percent of sticker on it, so were they doing that and still not sellingit and still throwing out a bunch like why won't Groceres just throw seventyfive percent off sticker on something? When you do that so yeah, that's itlike partially theyrethey're doing that and still not selling it partially.They don't want to sell all their prodecive. Fifty percent off when youput a sticker on a product and leaving the store the only person is going tobuy. That is somebody who is coming willing to buy a full price item, soWel we've done and what we were able to prove through the APP is that we'reactually driving in new customers that weren't shopping at your storebeforehand. We're driving new customers that arespending more money, while they're in store and full price items got it. Sothe problem with the fifty percent off is, I was willing to go in and buy thenormal apples, but I saw fifty percent ofl all get those instead. Also, it'snot like, like you want that. So what I'm learning now about retail anythingparticularly grocery is that you have different customers that are going toshop different ways, so you want to have an offering for people that areonly going to buy the sticker program. You want an l, you want to have anoffering for people that are owning and get delivery, people that are onlygoing to have pick up people that want to sit down in a grocery store and havea coffee like grocers have to to think that way now, so we also got lucky onthe timein. The market, because it's changing so drastically yeah so Um. How was the initial? How did you getthe initial cell? So Y Y? I mean this is like an overwhelming for me coolidea, but I'm thinking there's so much to figure out here, like Oh, my God,I've got to get htailor's on board and then I've got to get people to downloadan AP and like gisically there's just like. Where did you even start? So wegot. I hired a team off of upwork to build the APP and there was a team inChina. I think, and the name of the person was Nazima and they had apicture of an Asian woman, and I didn't know until like five months laterbefore the applas even done that if you reverse Google, that image of thatperson on their skipe, it was like a famous Chinese actress. So I've no ideawho built the first version, the AP and...

...also they would never talk to me. Weonly talked through s. They wouldn't talk to me on voice call or video onlytyping and like the English was so horribly broken. So I have no idea whobuilt the first version, the APP and the way that we got our first grocerywas a guy that I went to university with his dad was the former so of a bigretailer in Canada and his right hand. Person ended up being a guy named JeffYork, who is now the Cocio of a grocery chain called farm boy, that's based inOttawa, so jeff used to play hockey. He has a hockey background and he's, Idon't know, maybe like midtill aht forties early fifties. So I gotconnected through my friend's Dad t jeff, the the flashfood deck wentthrough to him and- and I ended up getting his like contect in foe and I'memailing him back and forth, and then he just starts ghosting me. So it waslike Tuesday of whatever week it was. I wasmaking no money I'd quit my job at stage and I'm literally like how thehell do I get a grocery. So I called JF is his phone number's on the bottom ofthe email and I call hem and I'm like Hey Jeff Josh Mengus he's like Heyhowre. You doing good, listen, I'm coming out to Ottowalk 'cause farm woas,based on I was like I'm coming out to Ottawa n Friday ecause we're looking athiring somebody for eastern Canada. We don't have any stores. We have nothinglike this APP as being velled by somebody who I've never talked to mylife and I'm like. Are you free to like sit down and like talk shop all andthere he's like Yas Sur, come by the store? Ten, a M, I'm like perfect. Solet me see if that works with my calendar. Oh yeah, Caendertin, yeah,okay, yeah! That's your fit ing! Well here all the funny thing is like I'mtelling my like now: Wife Who's, my girlfriend and all this, and she waslike like what like like. What are you going to tell him? I'm like? I don'tknow so I wake up at four in the morning on Friday and I drive to Otnawa,I Made Jeff at the store for like twenty five minutes of that. Like tenminutes he's on the phone talk with somebody else give hem an idea of likewhat we want to do and he's like. Okay, yeah, we'll give you a store in London,Ontario 'cause. It's like the furtheest away from their hub in Attowa. He'slike we'll give you a store out there like good luck, all right, shake hishand and like drove right back to Toronto. It was like a twenty fiveminute meeting and that ended up like man we did. We did both farm boy and wedid another grocer in Canada. Three store pilots like meaningful Groceres,with no contract so like we're selling near dated food like you wanht to talkabout risk like now now we're like we're well past that now everything'scontracted, like things are done properly, but I have investors now thatare like trying to put money into our company like, fortunately, we're atthat point and they're talking to me about like well like what, if you missout on this or what, if you miss out on that, like you're being too risky onthe market in front of you and I'm thinking like we just sold food. Thatwas near expiry, like basically having like all the liability on us for twoyears like this, is not risky in comparison towhat we did so yeah like we got one per actually funnystory about farmboy. We got one store in London, Ontario and the model washorrible, like th, the APP was so bad. The Experience Wos the at that you haddeveloped was the AAT had developed by the team in China. The experience wasbrutal. We actually came to Westard and we had a pizza party at Western and weconvinced people to come out for free pizza and then we gave them credits orwe just gave them. We just e transferd the money to try the APP and in thatfirst week, so we launched like the one store for we didn't know how long T itwas going to be. We had no contract in so basically, this like operator inLondon who, like already has so much on his Plat, gets this new thing droppedon Hem. So he doesn't even like me. Nobody in a store likes us and we run aone store pilot and it only goes a week and in that week like we didn't knowhow long a go going to go. But in that week we saw we had like. I don't know,eleven people that bought and of the eleven like six or seven, and I boughta second time in a one week, time period and we sold like almost half ofthe food they made available. So we meet with farmboy that same operatorwho didn't like me at the end of that week and he's like listening like we're,starting to get some backlash on like the APP and how bad it is, how slow itis and how miserable the process is and like they had no access to the numbers,so they didn't know what they had sold. They didn't know what they madeavailable like. We knew that so selling whatever it was like almost fiftypercent of the food, like repeat customers that were new to farm boy. SoI'm like okay. Why don't we do this Ryn like? Why? Don't we just? We have awhole bunch of things we have to F. I t figure out with the Apple. Let's justtake this out of the store today, we'll rebuild it and we'll come back inJanuary. So this is like October and he's like you know what that actuallysounds like a way better idea and for him he was just like getting a headachefrom his storestaff. So for him he's just like yeah whatever, like. I don'tever want to think about this again and for me we stopped that day in the store,and that was like one of the riskiest decisions that I met, because that Imade because we only had one store. We onade one opportunity, but I knew thenumbers, and...

...that was really it like. I knew thenumbers and I make s like this- is not going to be sustainable, so we ended uppulling out. We hired an agency in Toronto. We raised a little bit ofmoney at that time we hire an agent Sen Tronto. They built the next version ofthe AB which, like is still the foundation now it's is like a reallygood agency in Toronto came back to that one, and then we pitched themetrics to farmor and they were like wow. Okay, like the fact that we werein and out of the store so quickly. We didn't let a linger long enough thatpeople had a really bad experience, employees, and so they saw the resultssand. They're, like okay, like maybe there'se something here, so they gaveus another store and we started in another store that Jaanuary and theneventually we had three stores in London and then eventually we had treestores with longoes that came on and through that whole time me and my teamwere driving to London. All the time like we were in stores all the timetalking to people trying to figure out how to make it easier, and I think thestorestaff seeing how hard we were working like they. Just I don't know ifit was pitied us or like appreciated us, but they were giving us really usefulfeedback which is kind of like the temwh we're going to talk about today,but they saw how bad we wanted it and they aligned with the mission ofreducing food wayst back to the story about my sister hen to throw out food,so they wanted. They wanted to work too. So Yeah Gutsy call. But the right callwhen I think about. If you let it linger few people use itissues and complaints, pile up that could have been it. You know that thatcould have been flash food may not that that could have been the end. Thatcould have been the first and last pilot. We would have a hundred percentF heallike if o like it would have absolutely like crash and burntd yeah,so pull it out. So you raise the money to develop. The at properly is that wehad raised on those matrics that we had from that one store we had yeah weraised, we actually had there's a group in Toronto and whateverI don't care th, I think it's public. I think it's on e website, but they ownthe chase hospitality groups they w like clet little fin, Casamoto andYorki, like they own, a bunch of restaurants high in restaurants and atthe time we were going to do this in restaurants too. So before I had goneout and raised money from any friends in family, I was like. I have to getsomebody who's actually like WHO's, not my friends and family. That's going towrite a check and they were the first ones that wrote the first check and itwas a significant check like significant atthe time. Yeah every check is significant. Anto start up. So whenthey put the money in then I told everybody else: here's our mache hiswhe we're doing we're going into another store in January and hers whowrote the first check and that's where, like other money came in, so we endedup raising four hundred and fifty Ka that first round a hundred thousand ofit went to geting the AP developed, but like even funnier, we a Youw like we're talking about earlydays. We had our first ourcto. I got introduced to 'cause, I'm not tactical.I'm like the at that I' built is basically broken and not BASII in Sho. Ye Al want to see. Iant it's Al there, it's so bad, but there 's a guy that I gotintroduced to who was on Sabatical. He had sold a digital agency and he was atsales force after and he just got crowned down so he's like I'm justchilling, I'm just Goinna, I'm just going to like consult with people forthe rest of the year, so he was consulting on the EGH on the at thatWehad built from the Asian team and he's the one who told me like. I don'teven know who's building this and I was trying to give in to hem and join thecompany. We had no money, we hadn't even we had not yet got our first checkand then I'm pushing I'm pushing we're payingthis guy like a couple of thousand dollars to like do an audit on the teckand he comes back and Hi's like it's actually not horrible. But these arethe things you need to switch around and we ended up getting our first sixdecay in the door and what I did was I found were in Toronto, like I found atwo story: Loft in e liberty, village, and we signed a three year lease. Itwas like four thousand dollars a month. We had six Tocam n the bank, no ideahow mhuch more money was coming in Soin a three year, lease went on: Kajijibought a whole bunch of use, furniture me and Mysiaffo, and we drove allaround like the GTA we've packed the place and Wewere like like toOurcttothe Guy, who was doing the Tecaudi that were like Chris Y in' Ou,just at least like come check, ut the office hes like Gara I'll, come bylater this week, so Chris Walks in the office she's like wow, like you guys,have like a real thing. You guys have a real thing: you're, all right, fine,I'll, join and forget my stabatical. That's how we got ta shoot O so likethat could have blown up the company too, and I had no idea how much moremoney was coming in, and so, where is ridiculous by the way Rdwhat, whateverwhatever needs to get dia? Where did the dragons ten experience fit in sowas this the school story was it after all of this yeah? I was after this so'cause. I I watched the episode season. Twelve yeah and the story is a goodstory. They ere they were pretty bought in metrics were like Ot. They wereright, hi, it was there wasn't enough. thehwhere did thatfit in so that. So it's funny that you...

...ask, because that happened. The showgot, aired, got filmed in the beginning of April and in my episode, didn't err,til the end of October and they film for forty five minutes, and then theyput four minutes of it on T v. So like I had no idea what was going on t V,but yeah Wehad, just at that time. Wead just got back into that one store inJanuary and, like it wasn't doing much volume but like the percentages werestill like on point, is what we saw in the first pilot, but how I got on theshow was. I met Michelle Romano at a conference in Ottawa SASS north the October beforethe show aired, so we were about to start the first pilot that like no, Ithink we had just finished that pilot that, like we were now hiring an agencyand shoronor to build the AP. So I mave Mishall this conference and Iintroduced myself to her talk for a couple of minutes. She's, like I knowwhat you guys are doing. Somebody has sent me like the Flash Food Dack, likeI think it's cool she's, like here's, my personal email, send me an email inMarch and I'll get you on the show and I'll offer you a deal 'cause. I likewhat you're doing and if you take it, you take it if not whatever, I'm, I allright so sure enough, like I sent her inemail in March, no response send herfallow up. She gets back to me Sheis, like here's. This connects me to theproducer like gets me to like the final interview phase and then I go on theshow and she is the one who like jumps up with the deal, with an offer on theshow, and I was like wow like regardless of whatever she actuallycame through, and it was really really cool. That's Neat Thatd, so you did adeal in the show did Iti going through did t deal on, the show did not gothrough which, like often they don't yeah, I mean the reason why I didn't gothrough is ecause. They wanted from the show they wanted six months to do dodiligence and we were like on the last legs F that four hundred and fifty Klikthat was almost gone, so I'm like, even if I want to do this guy, it's like ifyou take longer than like a month here like we're bankrupt by O, I needthother ots over, like we can't t. We can't like. I can't even think ofoutside of this 'cause, like six months, like I'm, probably going to be at myfourth career job. I that, like that'that's how this is going so use ad,no go just based on Li. We just we had to bring ham money faster, weve got ityeah, and so at that point, with the I mean you run out of money, Po, thenumbers are good, but you're running out of money. So did you do? Did you doa bigger raise then right after tha other round Yearase, seven hundredfifty K that, like summer towards the end of that summer and one of ourinvestors in our first round rote a two hundred and fifty k Cheq and he wrote atwo hundred fifty thou? No, he wrote a twenty five Ktrack, the first round inthe four fifty room. Then he ran a two hundred wrote a two hundred and fiftythousand dollar check seven fifty round and that lea the next round and becauseof what I had learned from other people and like sending out a monthly email toyour investors that second round of seven fifty for one. When we close thatround, we had seven hundred and fifty three thousand dollars in the bank solike when you talk about like timing like we were right there and from startto finish. It took three weeks to close, because we had kept people so informedon what we were doing and people just appreciated. How open and honest wewere with everything. So what I? What did you do? You send? You send amonthly update letter to your investors, Yep yeah. This is loo Yep. This is themost. It's a male drip. It's a male champ. It's a drip campaign on a monthybasis. We still do we centerd an email with like what's happened last month,what we're looking for the next month, like just in general, highlights on thebusiness and that there was one of our investors sopart of that seven hundred and fifty k came in. We want a pitch contest inMontreal called STARTUFEST, so you get a hundred thousand dollars for theprize, which is actually a ten thousand dollar investment from ten differentpeople, which is like a complete headache for the CAP table like lookingback like it's like. Okay, this should be communicated way differently. Itwasn't a hundred thousand dollar gift. Exactly it's way different. We knew itwas an investment, but we didn't know what would be from Tende from people TNK each. So it is what it is we needed to survive, but the further down theroad. I think this was like. I don't know so that that'll happen. I twentyseventeen and twenty eighteen one of those investors who I never met and whowas like very wealthy, has a bunch of real estate, a bunch of restaurants inToronto. It sends me an email after one of my investorup tates and he's likehey, give me a call like as soon as you can. This is my phone number, so I callhem is like Hey Josh, I'm so Andso we haven't met yet, but I just want to letyou know that, because of how transparent you are on these monthlyupdates, like I appreciate it so much and if you end up doing something else thatthis doesn't work like. Let me know because I'll fund you and he's likeI've written way, bigger checks into a lot of other people, and I just don'tever hear from them again. So this is like. I really appreciate what you'redoing, and I would assume that a lot of the other investors do too, and it'sjust like a simple monthly email about what's happening in the business. Whatare the challenges? Wat are the opportunities and wht Howmis thinkingabout the next month, and how long is...

...it like how many it's like, literallyjust typed, up, there's? No, it's not fancy Os all put pictures in sometimesI'll put gifts. I started off putting gifts. One of our investors now hassaid that, like they know that the business is doing well now because wesay less like before, we were just telling a story about nothing and likeputting gifts in and like making it funny and now we're actually like Hereothe metrics like we don't want to share anything else, but not like sometimesite was like four or five paragraphs. I mean we went through so much like wewent through Texstars with target in Minneapolis, like that was abig thing. We got a pilop with law. blaws like there were some reallymeaningful things that happened for us, so I would say it's probably like. If youread off of a medium, it's probably like a five to seven minute. Read everytime. Hm Yeah ihave been involved, there's a fewcompanies that I've been involved in. That did that, and I found it reallyhelpful and UH. I do have some investments out there right now that Idon't get as I get updates when I ask for them yeah, good or bad. I feel like I'd ratherknow, I'dead rather be along for the journey than like surprise. Here's anUpdat at the end of the year, so tit's a good practice. It's funny! That'sactually what, like our most of our angel investors, get value in justbeing part of the ride because they're just like I don't want to go through itor I can't go through it like I've got kids at home like I can't dropeverything and start a company, but yeah I'll, give you ten or fifteen ortwenty thousand dollars. Just. Let me feel, like I'm a part of this and fromwhat I learn from our investor groups. Awesome and, like sure, like people,ask me questions and I'm like leave me alone, like wait till the update andlike that happens like we have like sixty people on our cap table now. Theother thing too, is everybody. Tells you not to raise from that? Many people,but like good luck, try not to go bankrupt, so do whatever you have toJos surmvive, but our investor group is like because I'm so open andtransparent, like they appreciate it and they're having fun and they'realong for the ride with me. So like they're in it right beside me, yeah,that's great. Something h strikes me about use. Your whole story is you're.Just doing it your own way, no you're not doing it. The way that you thinkyou should or just doing it authentically and unapologetically inyour own way. I think it's awesome. I have a friend WHO's, a yeah. I mean like there's so manystories. There was one where this one's actually probably meaningful.We're meeting with the VC, and this we C is this guy was a Jdmba like came upthrough finance and ended up being like an associated o, vc fun and then aprincipal like a reputable vc fun. So he's like, why have you not scaledfaster in Canadian grocery and I'm like hm well, cading grocery, like it'sogopalistic? It's basically like white male and I said like big expletive like like complex, likeBig Eagle, complex, and he cuts me off and he's like, don't ever say that tome, because you'll never say that to a grocer executive. So don't say it hereand as soon as he said it I was like like actually like. I don't know if Iever wold or not fast forward like literally a month later. It's mesomebody that I'm trying to get to invest in my company that I have andended up getting thi tried for like two years and were sitting in front of twolike the CEO and the Coo of one of the biggest retail companies in Canada inlike one of the biggest yeah, a big company and they're. Just like why Havyou not scale faster and like canading grocery, and I like Kindo like hold onmy laugh and I'm like well, like you guys an now. It's like white male, likebig AC wil, have complex and they just both broke out laughing they're likeyeah, okay, like we get it. So what I learned by having so many investors andlike having really good people in our company that are employees that arelike well like partners with me, is that I'm Goin to talk to so many differentpeople. That, like I just can't lie, and I have to be myself because even ifI wanted to lie, I would catch myself in a lot like. I there's just too manypeople that I that Araccountable to me. So what I've learned is like you haveto be yourself and from a sales perspective like when you sit acrossfrom somebody at a grocery chain and you're, just telling them how it is.It's so much more effective like the story. The sales process, like we now get to a point where it's likelisted like. If you don't care about this issue like we're not going to bepartners, because it's just it's going to waste our time and you don't want tosell your garbage at you're, going aotrow it a a discount so beingauthentic. I think now and like Mark Cubans at it too, like being nice, isreally overlooked in in business, but I think it's critically important,because basically, the way that we got law blaws is I'm sitting across o oneof the executives. I finally got from the right person and tell her the story.This kind of the same way that we talke, how did you get? There was cold Emailo,cal, separate, okay, Wel, we'll come back tothat one yeah I mean like I could I can go into it 'cause, it's like relativelyquick. In brief, how did you get the meaning with Blah Blah? I guess Ex. Igot asked by a PR company to speak at Nastley's employee day for like athousand people and then they're like how much do you charge and I'm likebroke at this point, I'm like. Ah, this number like made it up. They're, likeokay yeah, like we want you to come, do...

...this you're going to do like a Qe, an ostage with er CEO for fifteen minutes, so I take the sea for coffee afterShelley Martin and I'm like listening, I'm trying so hard to get into law.BLAWS, like can Yo Chs me the right people. She introduces me to a guynamed grant phrase: The former COO. I take him for breakfast, he's like thisperson's the right person that you need to talk to all N ss. To her. I meet her.We talk for fifteen twenty minutes. I tell her the exact SA story. I've toldeverybody else and she looks at me and she's like. I think my son would love to shoit thisway. I think Ho'd feel really good about it, like we're going to try thislike that's how it all happened. It wasn't like a like for us. It's likecheck the money box like sure whatever, but like this is just the right thingto do. You shouldn't be throwing at this food and if we could do it bydriving people into your store and spending more money like you shouldjust be doing this yeah yeah. So you got the meeting you were. You were inthe meeting youwere talking about being like authentically you an a meetinggetting to lo the LABLAS meeting yeah. It was just like it was J. it's it'sstill. The exact am like I, whoever I've met in these organizations andthrough time now, actually there's there's another side story. That'sprobably meaningful. We got into tax stars retail, so tex stars is like athree month incubator and why that's important? Is We got into the COHORD?That's partnered with target in the? U S, and so they pick ten companies. Theyfly you out to Minneapolis. You work at a targets at office and from week twoto week. Four, you have this thing called mentor madness, so you meet withten different people a day for twenty minutes and they po Cols in yourbusiness, and then they get to pick after if they want to be a led mentourfor you, and that means they work with you through the three months and helpyour business out in one of those days at this cohoard we had executive day,so we had five of the top ten people a target that we would meet with. So Iended up getting the chief strategy officer of target and the CEO BrieCornel, as my lead met, Toer Brian Cornell grew up without money. His Dadpassed away when he was young. His mom was on welfare. H, he's a C O targethis Momma's on Welvar. She gave him up to his grandparents ECAUSE. Shecouldn't afford even having him and he had a really difficult upringing. Sothe day before this, like metor madness like executive day, I didn't sleep fora single second and I'm like if I can't sell this guy, who came up with nothingon the concept of what we're doing like. I have to shut the business now becauseit's just it's not going to hit and sure enough like he ended up being likeyeah. I loved this, and it was the same way that this person at law- blaws,like you, just have to get to the right people from what we're doing andthey're just like y check the financial box. Okay, like money sure, but this isthe right thing to do and yeat like the s target and I like he'll, get back tomy emails almost immediately and I fly down still once a quarter try to tomeet with them in person for twenty minutes and we just sit down and like. I just ask him a whole bunch ofquestions. He tells me what he thinks and then I usually cut the meaningshorter, because I give him back his time and he appreciates it and that'swhat gets him like to consistently answer Ma. I think Ke different sales models for differentcompanies right, but I think years is especially in the early days to get acompany body N at this level, like you're, not going to get that from a summer analysts doing cold calls to theyou know: Middle Management. I think t you have to go about it, the way thatyou've been going about it for this one. It feels that way yeah. So if you were to think back what weresome of the best parts, an worst parts over the last few years of getting thiscompany going like some of the highlights the highlight realism withthe the Super High HIVHS and would have been some of the most challengingthings so I'll say two things and then I'll go into that answer. The first isthat everyday is the best day in my life, and everyday is the worst day ofher life and it's all the time that never goes away. So you have to becomfortable wit, being uncomfortable. The other thing- and I don't know ifthis is teat- ut- that you're going to ask or not, but what I did at thebeginning before I quit my job. When I had the idea, was I told every one ofthe smartest people that I knew about it and they all poked holes on it andsaid like this is bad about this? Is that about this isboutand? What thatdid at the earliest phace? Was it like vetted through a bunch of bad ideasthat I had, and it got made to like that that team in China that built thefirst verson of the APP it wasn't good, but it was very simple because I hadasked as many smart people as I could about what they thought and they gavetheir honest opinions. So a lot of people will tell you lik keep your ideaclose to your chest. To me, I think it's, the complete opposite nobody'sgoing to copy you like that, doesn't really happen for companies that havenothing tell as many smart people as you can and get holes poked in it. The highlights man like we have one of our top customers is a youngmother with three kids and she's, like my husband, like our husband, just gotlaid off from work like we can't afford food like our kids, never eat the kindof stuff like they'v, never even tried some of the stuff that we're buyingthrough flashro now and like some of those reviews like that's just wethat's the stuff that matters to me like that in the environmental piece,like the fact that, even if right now,...

...we can't scale this internationally andall thou beareis, like a grocery platform for Lalas the biggest grocerin Canada, to produce their food wast as significantly as they are like it'smillions of millions of pounds of food that otherwise would have been thrownout. Like even the environmentlangle of that to me. It's like we've already,like we've kind of already not made it, but like we've, put a dent in this, andeven if all that happens, is a bunch of copy cats come out and copy what we'redoing, and it's effective everywhere and like. I still think we're driving alot of value to a big partner like we'll be OK, we'll do well, but themarketal copythis and like that, to win collectively for everyone. So thebiggest winds is like seeing how much this affects. People like some peopleare saving thousands of dollars like annually, which is awesome. The biggest loss is hm firing, people's really tough firing,people and uh, which, like sometimes it's warranted.Sometimes it's not, but one of like I had to like go of a friend of mine.Just because, like she came on too early, we had too many people. Therewasn't enough for her to do and like sitting acoss from her having a letthergo like that was really difficult. That was probably the probably the most difficult thing butoutside of that, like I don't think that you get a high output from peopleif you like, if you make things to like life or death, I think that work has to be even Keel and you'llhave your highest amount of olput. If you have ownership of what you're doingso, I guess one of the challenging things is like as a CEO and learning tobe a CEO. You have to relinquish basically everything like. I stillthink I could do a lot of things better than other people can, in particularcategories of our business like specific things. But if I do them, thenI'm a worse CEO, because I haven't given other people the ability to growand do those things better than me and the R Oi of like what some people aredoing now is like so much better than what I would have done so being able torelinquish. That was really difficult, but I learned it because I had a reallyhigh level team and they're like let me do this or like I'm leaving and I'mlike. Okay, that's enough all right, you could do it so how many people nowin the company we went from seven last December to like thirty five now. Sowhat do you is a C of a growing? Well funded? You know thirty, five percentcompany. What do you? What do you do like? What Sho o CEO of a company ThatsIZs, be spending his time on her time on making sure that things aren't breaking andcommunication, so keeping people accountable, driving people to like whywe're doing what we're doing like weeminding people of that every week?So we have a weekly stand up on Friday and then keeping the CA like keepingthe bar high. So Netflik, I don't know if you've read much about like netflexs, hr yeah, so netflex will like only hire good people. That'll do like thebest job and if they can't fulfil like netflexis high calibr they'll, let themgo but they'll pay them more than they have to when they'll help them find.The next place, like that's, ultimately like what I want to do and like create,but also at the same time I want to develop people, and I want people tolike get there. So what do I do like? I was in Dallas this week. I was inMinneapolis last week, I'm still at the point where it's me and one othe personwho are doing partnerships and trying to get in front of more groceries, andthat is the most important thing that we could be doing right now, becausewe've done this in Canada. Now, if we want to be now it's less about like will this workor not 'cause we're past that, like every matric, is so solid, and I say that humbly, but now it'slike how big can we build this business? So it's kind of a different challengewhere, like how many people can we get in front of that? Are meaninful peoplein the US specifically? And how quickly can we execute on on the? U S like wedid in Canada, and can we even do it or not? So it's around like just makingsure people are happy and motivated and then also just not letting everythingbreak. If I can yeah, it's been a cool story to see, because I mean a year agoyou and I were on a panel and growth to and h. You were working on trying toget that first, major partnership, so I told you th. The reason that I knewit was doing well was not that you'd raise money, not that you had twentymore employees in Lindoln, not that there were new locols on your website.The reason I knew that you were doing well is because good people, I knowgood people, have joined your company and stayed, and there are people outside of you-know the tech community that, in my own friend groups, have shared with me: Hey,there's this cool new APP that I'm using so it's being picked up. Thepartnerships are happening. It feels like all the leading indicators aregood and that's why I think it's cool to bring you on the show now 'causeyou're sort of like right in the middle of this journey. Who knows where itends up but t cool to take a snapshot or a picture in time of where you're attoday Yh thanks? No, it's listen, it's exciting and like it could still allblow up. It seems like it's less and less likely to blow up, but yeah, likeI mean it's working like I'm really like living. I A start up dream rightnow and especially from the fact that,...

...like we don't need capital, so it'salso very different being on the other side of the table, where an investorwhere anybody has tried to sell you money and you don't need money, becauseit's nock at a fuel growth like that of itself, is a really really strange place to be. But yeah like things arelike things are going Al like they could blow but Ata time, but like it's,it's going all right right now, that's great! So now we got a our listenerbasis growing nicely. Is there anything that the community can do for you? Whatcan we do to help? Where can we find flash food? Let's start with that,flash food is across T E country in a whole. Bunch of Grocery Stores SuperStore, we're going to be adding other banders next year. Law Blas were inZayers were in basically like a lot of the law. blazone banners across thecountry and you could download it on the abstore or the GOOGL play store. Iactually follow us on Instagram at flashfood ink where at like ninethousand and four hundred Gitit to ten exactly well. If W, I think it's likenine thousand, I think we're like seventy people away, but once you getto ten thousand there's a whole bunch of other features that open up. Sothat's that's like I really guess. That's the big thing so that slash foodink all one word that would be cool followe that are you hiring yeah, we'realways hiring. So I don't even know what the roles are like when you askabout what a C Eo does it's just like hey? What do we need for differentpeople to be easier at their job, and so if people are bought onto themission, always hiring for good roles, if it's not up on the website, keep intouch yeah, flashfood dotcom, we have a whole like careers page or just like,send us an email with your resume and and we're in Toronto, like yeah, Yeah Rico to US cool, hey. Iappreciate you taking the time to share this snapshot in time of Your Journeyand I think you're, all the leading indicators. Look pretty good. Sowishing you guys best to luck in the next chapter, yeah Thack, it's cool tobe at the snap shot of like this point and seeing you again after, like yousaw basically like the clutch and grab and scratch and like all right, we gotto this phase, we'll see where it goes next, but H, yeah, it's cool to runinto you! Do episode and we'll do the chapter three epsa, O Ater Cool G asyou've been listening to the Iviongmin or potcast to ensure that you nevermiss an episode subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player orvisit IV dot ca forward, slash entreprener ship. Thank you so much forlistening until next time.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (42)