The Entrepreneur Podcast
The Entrepreneur Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

29. Option C

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This isn’t anyone’s Plan A.

We are living through a live case study of an unprecedented global pandemic, and many of your colleagues who had their dream jobs lined up after graduation have found the rug pulled out from under them.

COVID-19 has forced hundreds of thousands of new grads to change their plans entirely — and not to their Plan B ‘fall back option’ but to something entirely different. Something they weren’t considering in the first place.
They have been forced to pursue Option C.

Graduations have gone virtual, and offers are delayed or rescinded but Option C can be a blessing if you allow it to be.

In a special edition of the Ivey Entrepreneur Podcast, Eric Janssen talks to four Ivey students who have pursued non-traditional paths and made boulders their blessings. This episode features Jacqueline Scott, Allora Athletics (www.alloraathletics.com), Natalie Diezyn, Marlow (wearemarlow.com), Chloe Beaudoin, Apricotton, and Jack Jelinek, Crank Lite (www.cranklite.com).

You're listening to the Ivy Entrepreneur podcast from the Pierre L Morrisse at Institute for Entrepreneurship at the Ivy Business School. In this series, I be entrepreneur and Ivy Faculty member Eric Jansson will anchor the session. All right, everybody, welcome to the Ivy Entrepreneur podcast. Thank you so much for making time. I know you're all running businesses and super busy, but I appreciate you making time for me, of course. Next yeah, thanks for having us. Great, great to reunite. Yeah, for the benefit of the audience. So we're going to be watching the video, but a lot are going to be just listening to the audio. So for the benefit of the audience, why don't we take a thirty seconds or a minute and we'll allow each of you to introduce yourselves to the group. So maybe we'll start with Natalie. Just a little bit about you, your background in your company. Yeah, okay, so my name is Natalie. I'm doing a dual degree with ivy and MIT so I'm actually going back to ivy in the fall, well, virtually, and I started my company Marlow, with a couple of cofounders from Ivy. It started out from the MVP project and it's just grown into something bigger and a lot more complicated, and so that's what I'm doing full time now and I'll be doing that part time during school year as well. And what is Marlowe? In a few senses, Marlow is a menstrual product start up. So we have our hand in a lot of different areas. But first of all we're starting with creating in the world's first lubricated Tampon. So that's been our main project right now. But overall we're trying to create a community for women to like, express their issues with the products that they currently experience and talk about problems that they have just in feminism in general. So get encompasses a lot of different things, but we're starting with product first of all. Perfect. Let's go next to chloe. Yeah, so I'm chloe. I just recently graduated from IV in the HBA program and during MVP, my cofounder, Jessica, and I really fell in love with the idea of apper cotton and so apric cotton is an online broad company and we're aiming to help tween girls with the brush open experience, because we found that back when we were young girls we had trouble finding bras that fit us and that were age appropriate, and then even now, girls are still going through the same issue, and so we want to help them find Braus and also feel come comfortable and confident in their bodies when they're going through this experience. Awesome. It's been cool to see this one involved Phoe, so we'll get into it in a little bit. Next, let's go to Jack. All Right, I'm Jack Jelic. I just Graduate Ivy as well the HBA program. So I graduated in the virtual forum, which was weird, but it's all over, which also feels weird. So I started a company with a fellow IV section. Made of mind that I met HBA one. He had the idea and September of Hba to and said, you know what, I have a said deal, I'll do it if you do with me. I said give me days, think about it, get some research, and then came back to him in a half an hour and said I'm in. So we started crank lightlog or, which is a value beer company targets towards young adults. Awesome. Lastly, let's go to Jackie. Okay, same as ever on this call. Also just finished or was in my HBA. But unlike everyone also on this call, I actually had no intention of starting a business, but that's what happened because I was on exchange, came back from exchange, obviously, and my job, which supposed to start in the fall, got pushed back to two thousand and twenty one. So basically I had eight months on my hands and thought I don't really want to work an office job before and office job, so I started a Laura Athletics, which is a basically summer camp. I'm offering athletic activities for kids and then workouts or teens and adults, and it really really just came out of all the circumstances that are happening with covid and the fact that people aren't getting outside or having nearly as...

...much fun as they would be in any other summer cool. So big mix here. We've got Jack you're going at a full time yeah, Natalie, you are going back to school in the fall. Jackie, this is full time until your full time job. Yeah, darts question. And chloe, what's your plan? Is this on the side? It's a little complicated at the moment. It's it's like side, but also kind of full time because we recently got into the Western accelerator. So for me it's full time, but after the accellery might be part time. So it's kind of changing plans at the moment. We'll see. Sometimes these things take off and they pull you into them. So hopefully these pick off and they make it becomes a full time opportunity for you. So I wanted to get a feel for you've all started these for different reasons. Jackie, yours was sort of out of a maybe not necessity, because you could have done other things, but yours was just straight up being opportunistic. This is not like you had plans to be an Entrepreneuri at a school, but you ended up becoming an entrepreneur, so why not do something else that you were more comfortable with? Why I started business instead? Yeah, for me it felt a little bit safer because I do know I'm falling back on a job that's starting next year, so I felt like I have this pocket of time, why not do something with it other than you know, I could have gotten I could have gone back to the summer job I had last year, but why would I do that if I've already done it before? So that was that was my reasoning to do something entirely different. Jack. What about you? Did you know that you wanted to do something entrepreneurial and it was just a matter of finding the right idea or opportunity? How did you think about this? Yeah, so my family are all entrepreneurs, so I was kind of in my DNA, but I was interviewing for us. Kind of sucked in the ivy jobs which I was interviewing for Private Equity Consulting. I had a good private act internship last summer and was going back there and actually had a full time offer to a private acquity firm. But then I decided, once Mikey Indoeat the idea of my classmate, I thought why not dive all the way in, because I feel like I've got to. I really want to explore it or I'll regret things if I don't. Wow, so did you you turn down some fulltime job offers in order to do this? Yeah, wow, that's a big gutsie call and I know you had had some other ideas in the past. Jacking, written some business plans and that's some projects for a bunch of different things. So what what made you choose this one? Ultimately to sprint. That, I think because I knew that we could rely on our network the most with this. I knew that if I was going to do something right now, out of school, I'm actually in my target market, targeting this this beer company with so why not rely on that, rely on the knowledge that I've had, and your network's not going to be as strong for a young adults beer as it is in forth university. So I thought if I'm going to do this and do it right, I got to do it right now. Cool. And Natalie, I know you're going back, but did you know where? You evaluating other opportunities or this was always the plan, at least between this, you know, end of school last year in the beginning of school next year, I was actually recruiting and I was supposed to work somewhere in Toronto this summer as well, but that was kind of blew up. So, because the company is just one of those companies that doesn't benefit from covid I feel like there's two sides. It's done much sort but I also had a couple of other job offers that I've turned down as a summer went on, because it as it's just getting bigger and bigger. I'm realizing okay, this could actually be something, and I've always really loved entrepreneurship and more of a non traditional path, so it just seemed like it's the right time for me to do it right now. You're all sort of like making it seem like it wasn't a hard decision for you, but yeah, you must have had to wrestle with it a little bit more, or maybe you wrestled with it previously. I want to go to chloe for a second because Cloe, you were in one of my classes and to help the correct me if I'm wrong, but it's not. I don't think you had picked that you wanted to be an entrepreneur when you graduated from HBA, but...

...you ended up becoming one. So what happened would change. Yeah, so, I mean the last year when I was in your new venture creation class, like, entrepreneurship was not on my mind is at all. I just I love idea creation and that's one of the reasons why I took your course, but the actual executing on it was not like in my mind from at all. And so over the course of MVP I realized how impactful the issue we're trying to solve is and mixing that with my cofriender Jessica, who she absolutely loves entrepreneurship and it's she knew whatever the idea was, you want to go with it right away. And so combining those two things and then just kind of realizing how much I like starting things from scratch, like I probably have the longest list of hobbies is out of everyone in the world, because I love trying new things and just focusing on what I want and what what I'm interested in kind of helped me realize that this is something that I really want to do, especially with covid where things are changing so fast. Like everyone else, my plans have changed since and just taking the time to realize what do I want to do and what do I want my career to look like? That kind of helped me realize, okay, maybe on entrepreneurship is on the table, maybe it's something I do want to delve into. And once when I did start working on it more full time during the summer, it made me realize how much I enjoyed doing it and already seen the we haven't even started selling yet. We're starting in the fall, but just the impact we've had just from talking to girls about the issues has made me realize the impact that we can have once we do start selling, and so that's really what got me into wanting to pursue this. Awesome. That's great. So this is for anybody, but I know that some of you had worked on this as a project, some of you had worked on other ideas in other courses. So what ultimately made you decide that this was the idea worth pursuing full time, if only for full time, for a period, it's just the summer, or not. So what made you choose that this was the idea worth running at? I can go. I asked for me. It was just the fact that, like before, I can rely on my network and I knew that I want to be an entrepreneur and if I had a classmate or a body doing it with me, would be a good time. And saw I was like, you know what, this is the best time. We had a real world NBA and this idea is something that I feel like I could get going while I'm at school. So I why not to do something the side, keep it on a back burner and then once I graduated, then it was I think we actually have something here and it's starting to take off a little bit. Let's go full tilt for at least a few months and then reset and see, you know, what was those three months? Where those three months really productive? Did be see growth keep going? And if we do, let's keep going. And so we have those sort of check ins every so often with each other, saying is this something we want to keep doing? You want to keep doing, and I remember like throughout the school your we look at each other saying like are we going to do this, like are you still interviewing for other jobs? And it would be like yeah, I sort of am, but I kind of don't want to get them. And then we're like, you know what, if we're saying that, then why don't we just try? So Jack, but you you had there were other ideas that, frankly, reviabal that I know you were working on. Yeah, and this one more than others. Was it your partner that drew you into this one particularly, or was it just we want to find the one that can let us use our network the most, we know the customers the best. Like what pulled you in and made you push all the other ideas that you had actually worked on a side. Yeah, I think it was a little bit of both. Like we I saw the product and I could actually Tangelly pull my round my head around the idea of I could see the next few steps down the road where it's with the other ones. That's a little harder to see if you don't exactly know your target market as well as you know your target market when you are your target market. I feel like I'm saying that a lot, but that's how it felt. And then we actually had a real pitch deck made and then for your class at a projects for this that the sales playbook. And then I took that and I went to a possible customer and made a sale...

...and then I was like, okay, wow, this is this is kind of going and I'm still in class. Why would I say no? Awesome, so you had you had traction on it while you were still before you graduated even. Yeah, so we are initial launch would have been march, Hba to and we actually had the beer and everything made the day before our first sale and the company is incorporated in January. January, so it was going towards the second semester HBA to. Awesome, awesome, so Jack you're selling Jackie. You've got customers, so obviously your you had to put things out there. What was the first thing you did? How did you get this? How did you get your fitness business going? Yeah, so for me, I actually just wanted to learn how to make a website. Like I probably did not need a website, but I really had this idea that if I'm going to do this, I'm going to learn how to do it anyways. So I did that and I'd say maybe like a quarter of my customers have come from that website, but most of them have actually come from posting in facebook groups. HMM, so managing to get accepted into all these different parent groups on facebook. So I guess like the learning experience for me, and there was that you can spend hours doing something that maybe at the back of your head you don't you know is not necessary. But I'd say I gained way more out of learning how to build that website then I did just like posting a few things. So it's about the customers, but I also thinks about learning a couple skills along the way. Cool. So you're like the first thing you did was build a website, or did you have customers before that. Not so when you're talking about not knowing what idea to do, like I actually it was not until I had a whole sign made and it said a Laura at the top, but I didn't know if I was going to make it athletics or at one point I was like maybe I'll make masks. Like I really had no idea, and then won day I was like okay, enough, and then I like wrote it in with Sharpie a la athletics at the bottom, and so that was the first thing I did. I made this sign and I went sat outside and like just talk to people. Then the second thing I did was make the website cool, cool, and what a forcing function, like, I think yours, because there's such limited time, right and before you start full time, it's like I just need to go at something. Yeah, and it felt like the day I made a decision about something, some new information would come out. Like the day I decided to do this more summer camp thing came on the news that summer camps in Toronto are allowed to open again. That was like, Oh, okay, I should maybe reevaluate. Yeah, so every things going with go with you, Jackie. Everything's going with the business. They're good. I mean I'm basically busy every day of the week, but I go I've sort of put a lock on it, but I go away on the weekends. But I for me, I've had parents ask like if they can continue this into the fall. So right now I'm actually looking into actually hiring people to help with this, because I don't have enough hours on my own, and then seeing how I can keep doing this once it gets the cooler at time. So that's sort of the next step for me. Cool and Jack, I know your product is live. It's selling. I haven't sampled it yet, but parent things going on your d well, our whole business model was to sell wholesale to bars and events at universities and that first Dale I talked about, half hour before we were paid, the event was canceled and Covid hit and you're sort of stud still. So it was like a big shock because our whole business plan was just flipped on his head the day once we saw succeed in the next day it was just taken away. So we're selling, but we had to change the entire way. That magical word of pivot. We had a pivot and change the entire way and sort of organization of our company and how we're going to sell. So we're selling. We've sold Twentyzero Beers. We just picked up another twenty thou and we...

...have another eightyzero lined up and production for September. But again, like news comes out where things are opening and you sort of start planning to look ahead and then all of a sudden that's taken away or you have to push a different direction. And so we found that our long term business plan was only like two months long at the beginning because you're like, we have no idea how this is going to happen. We had to plan for plan ABCD all the way down to like H. Yeah, so covid is caused a bunch of disruption. It sounds like Jackie, you literally wouldn't have a business without covid. Nineteen Jack this was not plan a for you guys, given that your first order got pulled as in as things started to close down. For Natalie and Chloe, you actually have product based businesses. So how has covid changed your plans, if at all? We were really lucky for ours, because one of the biggest feedback for us is that, because we're an online brass store. So a lot of feedback was, oh, how are they going to try it on? You know, why would someone want to buy something online if it's something that you usually have to get measured for? And so with Covid a lot of people are shocking online now, of course, and even now that we're starting to open up stores, at least in Ontario, you still can't try things on, and so I've noticed a lot, a lot more online brass sales, which the way that people used to shop was always in store, and because more people are willing to buy online now, that's going to help us a lot. And so in that sense we've had kind of a positive we've we've had the positive side of covid. Of course we've both had negatives, like manufacturing has been a huge issue, since a lot of companies have are either closed at the moment or they've transition into making masks, and so trying to find in my manufactures difficult. There's been a lot of shipping issues, but I think as a company we've been pretty lucky. We're COVID has positively impacted us, which I think you know, we're one of the very few lucky ones who have benefited from it. Yeah, so that's cool. More and more people will be or have been purchasing online, so they're getting more and more comfortable with it. But right now, do you have the product already? Yeah, so we right now we're doing sampling. So we've been doing a lot of testing at the moment. I'd say that that was also the other big impact we've had is trying to have girls try on the bras and you know, we're trying to do it in a way that limits the exposure to different people and everything, but trying to get feedback and trying to have these girls try on bras to get fit measurements and other types of feedback has been really difficult for us, because trying to do that well not having to limit the exposure to different people, that's been very difficult for us. Yeah, yeah, what about you folks? No, only so we've benefited in some ways, but it's also been her for us in some other ways. So the way was the ways that we've benefited were. So our team is really big. We have six founders because, yeah, so we are all in our MVP product who I'll just relove the idea. So we continue with it. So each of us have had a lot of free time to get the ball rolling and to take on the parts of the businesses that we want and try out different roles. And we have some people working forty hours a week, which is amazing, and then we also have some volunteers who just have free time, friends or even strangers from the Internet who really liked what we were doing. We have about six volunteers working on things like creating content and product engineering and lots of things like that. So you've definitely benefited from lots of people having downtime. But then also trying to produce a medical device during this pandemic is very difficult because Health Canada is prioritizing getting those treatments to market and any licensing applications for Covid nightteen. So we've had a really hard time just being in communication with Health Canada...

...because pretty much every other like a medical device on the market is just getting a little bit ignored right now. Yeah, that's been difficult. And then same with manufacturing. It's exactly what everyone else is saying, like what chloe was saying, with manufacturers are changing into hand sanitizer factories or mask factories. So it's been a little bit hard for us to to find manufacturers as well, but still going. So how do you deal with that? I think that was one of the questions that we got some questions in advance from students and one of the big questions was specifically for your two businesses. How are you dealing with the supply chain issues? Are the manufacturing issues use? Yeah, so we struggled. I mean I think you know anyone trying to find manufacture, whether it's covid or not, it's very difficult. But we really struggled with find we first started our searching Canada and we found Canada especially it was everyone was transitioning over to masks. So that was really difficult for us. And then we started to kind of expand our horizons and we started looking into other countries and, to be honest, I think one of the big ways that we found a manufacturer was just through timing. Once, when we started looking into China, for example, that's when their covid restrictions were starting to lift, and so it helped us a lot with finding a manufacture and I think if we had, you know, tried a little bit earlier to extend her Harrisons, we still would have been unlucky. So I do think it's just a timing issue as well as patients. You it took us months to find a manufacture and I think again, whether it's due to covid or not, I think it'll just take a long time and you just have to keep looking for people and looking for new manufacturers. Yeah, inevitably, I don't want to say distracted, but people would have been prioritizing masks to the beginning of it right, and now I think it seems like the Shipping Times on masks are really coming down, like I'm able to get them faster than you were originally, so they probably streamlined that. It seems like it's definitely not back to business as usual, but people are now starting to take on different types of customers again, so maybe that that's what's opening up for you, Chloe, and you, Natalie, here teams. How Far Away are you from actually getting live with a product for Marlowe? Natalie? It's really hard to stay. We're still waiting on some emails from Health Canada, but it just like it depends on some licensing issues that we've been having and some manufacturers getting back to us. So it's hard to say right now, but I'll let you know as to do as I know. So how do you build? Is the focus now, then, like education and Building Anticipation? What are you doing now before you can actually sell? So that tot a lot of investors have been asking for like whenever we've had pitches or just general meetings with investors, a lot of them seem really interested in the idea and in our business model, but then they say we need more like market validation, we need more research and we need more proof that people actually want this. So what we've been doing is the education aspect. We've also made a tick tock. It's been pretty successful recently. We're just trying to like get the word out about our brand, and not even just in Canada or trying to do it internationally, because we want this to be like a worldwide brand. So yeah, exactly. We're trying to educate, we're trying to get as many people on our mailing list as possible to prove that there's demand for the product. Cool and Chloe, again, you're not you're not selling, but you're sort of in testing and pilot mode. Are you still? Are you collecting email addresses and building that launch list. What are your what's your focus? Yeah, right now we're just trying to get the product right. So right now we're doing a lot of stuff on like the more product development side of just getting our samples made. We just received our first batch of samples. So we been doing a lot of testing there and not only is that helping us with getting feedback on the actual product, but it's also getting...

...interest within the community. So right now we're starting smaller in Toronto and through all the sampling we've realized there's, you know, a huge demand for it as and it's also helping us with more of our marketing strategy as well. We haven't we haven't done the same thing as not the we haven't really started on the social media or or website side yet. But you know, even just asking one girl to trying to sample, she goes and talks to her friends, they get all excited and then it kind of starts this chain of people and now we've had parents asking us if, you know, if they if their girls can try it on and things like that. And so right now we're building interest, but more from a local standpoint, just so we can get the feedback and get the product right first before we actually start cool. So this is scary right. Scary Times like not knowing what's going to happen, even scarier if you add on starting a business problem, I think for most of you, for the first time. So what were your biggest fears and getting started? Will come back to a Jackie, because this was not not plan a, maybe not even plan B. So what were your biggest fears and getting this going? Yeah, for me, so I've always known that I've wanted to start my own company, but I wasn't really planning on doing it until, I don't know, maybe two years out, which is what a lot of Ivy grads end up doing. They work for a couple of years and then they go do something. So for me, I seem to have this idea at the beginning that whatever you do now will somehow impact any other business you want to ever make. So I think what some young people feel is that one job to the next, your reputation really really carries over. So I guess I had I was just nervous, like if something goes wrong, or maybe the website's really bad or like the instagram accounts lame or something like that, that it would sort of set up a reputation for you for the next thing you want to do, which I realize now is probably really irrational and was maybe a way of me trying to not start something. But yeah, I think that's something a lot of people feel, regardless of if it's like a smaller company, more summer thing, like what I'm doing, or if it's an actual big company with thousands of customers. Yeah, what about you, Jack, would the courage to admit what was freaking you out about getting this thing going? Well, we didn't really know anything about beer, like we we didn't know how to make it, we didn't know what goes into beer, did a cost, where to source anything? And then also like how are we going to pay for that? We're in school right now. You to pay for groceries? Hit that ten percent discount on Tuesdays, like that's what that was our life. And then all of a sudden we're thinking I've got to put in all this money to start a beer company and not even know beer. So those were two big hurdles. But then we work with equals, which is a contract bring any factor in London. So we were actually going there in between classes and they helped us build a recipe. So they were great and supporting us and letting us, holding our hands to the process. And then with funding, we sort of had to forget the little things, like we realize that all, like at the beginning you're going to have to obviously go into your brank account, go to the Bank of Mom and Dad, go to family friends, pools, whatever, and try to go what you can, and that's what we did. And then we realized, you know what, like if this fails, our family is not going to let us go homeless, hopefully. So they had to get over that, that that fear of failure that, you know what, we're not going to end up on the streets or we're not going to end up bankrupt, even though we could. We had to forget about that, like we have to think about how to make a beer right now. Yeah, it's like you thought through what is the absolute worst case scenario here, and it's probably not that you're going to be on the street. You know someone that. Mom and Dad, I'll probably let you crash on the coach until you figure out how to land on your feet. After that. That's definitely not the best scenario. But they have a company couch, so that was a good that's awesome. What's the end goal for this? I'm going to start with Jackie, because, Jackie, you're only doing this for as long as you can, I guess. So what's the end...

...goal? Yeah, for me to be honest, like this might sound of it shallow, but like this was just about making some money for me, like I was supposed to be having an income come September and it's like, okay, well, we got bills to pay as I'm going to do something. So when you asked earlier, you sent us like what does success look like for me? I wanted to make more than I did in my banking job last summer. So I basically just wanted to sort of proved to myself that you don't need to take the more certain path, like I'm sure Jack can attest to this, like you don't need to do the banking job and that's not necessarily the most lucrative path, and sort of just proved to myself for the coming for the coming years, next time I want to take a shot at this, that it's okay if it doesn't seem like it's going to be very successful from the beginning. So did you have you accomplished that? Are you on track to? I did three weeks ago, which is pretty because there's still a month left to summer. So I was actually very surprised at that. That's there's some comfort in knowing when my wife was between EAHP one and Hbtwo, she started a college pro franchise and worked her butt off and did ended up doing really well that summer and I think that confidence of knowing that, like in a worst case scenario, I can fend for myself. You know, in a worst case scenario, if things don't work out for me in all other ways, I could start my own painting company, go door to door and sell and do just fine. So hopefully you've got your confidence built up that, like in a worst case scenario, a Laura fitness is a fallback plan. You'll probably have a pretty okay life doing just that. Yeah, I think that's something them to know. For, like anyone watching this, that as much as the consulting banking path, and I know I'm a bit of a hypocrit right now because that's what I'm doing next year. But you know, you don't have to do that, even though it looks like this awesome, awesome path. Yeah, or you could do both. Do One on the side, do one for the summer and then and then start the other. What about we'll go to chloe, chloe, what do you ultimately want out of this? Yeah, so, because this is an idea that I've had since I was like twelve. For me, it's a huge deal to make an actual impact on these girls and see how there are their confidence changes. And so one of the big things that I want, just from I guess we're business perspective, is I really want to become a household name. I want to be I want Apricaan to be considered like the tween broad brand. Are just between apparel brand, almost like how you know everyone at the moment, when they think of victorious or when they think of Braus, they think of Victoria's secret. I want to be that, but for tweets. And I know it's a big goal, but I think you know, since last year when we first started working on on this concept, I think I remember we set our financials and it was like quite small, and then I remember you telling us, you know, think bigger a thing. What can it be if it could be ten times what you just said and like realizing how important this idea is to me and the impact I want to make a new to think bigger, to be able to actually reach that goal of being able to impact, you know, girls across Canada, girls across growth America and even across the world. Awesome, that's great that I remember that meeting. So that's great. I love the vision, Natalie. What's the what's the goal? With Marla? I think our company goal would be for people to use this that don't think they need it, because we've sent out a couple of mvps, send out actually over a hundred minimum Bible products now, and a lot of the feedback we can getting is like, I didn't even know I need this, but now I ten times out of ten I would use this if it was on the shelf. And I think you just want to get people to realize that, like, this is actually an awesome product and we all believe in it and we all need...

...it and we think there are many people out there who need it too. So just, I guess, getting people who don't necessarily have a medical condition that think they have a problem that need to use this. Step. We're just making it again like I host told, names something that people are comfortable talking about and something that isn't unusual to use. And then, personally, what I want out of Marlow is just to try on every hat. So I never thought I would be like doing the regulatory stuff, and now I'm just reading like tons of Health Canada documents to leave real terms that I didn't understand a month ago. And you know, we were have pitches of investors, which is also a huge exciting part of the business, and then the social media aspect. Like you kind of just you're able to take part in every single part of the business and learning from each of those experiences is my goal. So do you have any how big do you want this to be? Is this international business, you know, hundreds of employees? Is this focus on Canada, lifestyle type business? What do you want it to be? I don't think I want it to just be focused on Canada. We're thinking global and international sales. It just gets a little bit hard with regulations, but it's nothing we can't figure out. So we're hoping for it to be International. But we also really like the really close team that we have and if we can keep it a smaller team with international sales. That would probably be ideal for us. Cool. Finally, Jack, what's the goal for maybe? I know crank light is one, but is there? Is there goals for a bigger portfolio, or is it you just want to own it with the one product? Yeah, so we definitely want to get crank light up and running and have a strong community of crankers, what we call our followers, community of crankers to follow us and support our brand and then hopefully the crank umbrella can have some like vodka, sodas or other simple drinks. We want to focus on simplicity, keep it clean, like our whole we're a little anti craft as a craft beer, like we hate when people think say, Oh, it's got hints of honey and Oh now, like it's a beer, and we want to make sure that continues across the line of beverage products that we'd offer. But for us we want to focus on Canada and Focus Ontario first and really pick out where we think we can succeed before we go there, because it is hyperfocused. Like we want to make sure that we don't get distracted with looking into the states because it's such a big market, specially for beer. Drinkers, but we know that that's not somewhere where we could jump into right away and do well. There's so much competition, even as a good beer industry as a whole, it's huge. So we just want to make sure that we build up some followers and actually create a community around our product before we add others, and then stay hyperfocused on that. Young adults in Canada, because there're a beer made by young Canadians for young Canadians. Is there, for you folks, a size goal? Ultimately, this is this twenty brands? Is it to and just really own them? How big you on this thing to be? Yeah, I think it would be, honestly, the two, two or three. And then stay hyperfocused on that, because we find that beer as a is a very loyal product. Your customers are completely loyal to their beer and as soon as I start seeing that, oh, cranks now offering canned Mimosa or like something different, they might go okay, I'm not sure if I'm fully jumping in on the beer side of things. If we do that a few years down the line, then maybe we can actually start building up a secondary market for us. Got It. So I've a few more of them. Will wrap up. But if, knowing what you know now about covid nineteen, is there anything that you would have done differently, say, three or four months ago when we were just entering into this period? And we can start with you know, chloe, where were you, call it, three or four months ago? And is there anything now that you would have done differently? Yeah, it's a hard question because for me three months ago I was in, you know, not the best situation, because a lot of my plans had changed and so I think a lot of that stuff was out of my control and you know, it took a toll mentally on me and I think that affected how how much work I put into the company early on.

So of course I'd love to say, you know, I from the get go, I wish I'd been a bit more motivated. I wish I'd started earlier. But realistically, I don't think I would have changed anything because I think I needed some time for myself to, you know, just think to myself. What am I actually interested what do I really want? So I think what I did back then was actually right, even though, you know, it caused some issues. Now we're now we have some shipping delays and some things are a little bit different, but I think I did the right thing for myself and I think over time that'll be what's best for the company as well. Okay, Jackie, you're how many months in now? I started and end of June. No mettle. I don't even remember, to be honest. What days a blur? Two or three months in? Okay, anything you've learned in your two and a half months in that you would have you do differently, either if you could start again or your next time around? I wouldn't say anything during, I'd say beforehands like for me, I definitely spent like I spent a good two weeks being kind of upset about like coming home from exchange or just I wasn't even planning on being Canada this year at all. So, if I could, I would go back and sort of just tell yourself and roll with the punches a little bit more and not get so hung up on like covid ducks for everyone in some way or another, but it was also an opportunity to something really cool and really different. So just focusing a bit more on the positives, not even for a business, just like in life right now. I think that's sort of key to staying afloat to these days. Cool, Natalie, anything that you would have done differently, knowing what you know now about covid? I think that we would have spent less time strategizing and like writing down a hundred ideas and planning and just spent more time doing the work and actually, like putting action into our ideas, because, especially during Covid, it's so easy to sit at home all day and have meetings with your founders and say like okay, then we're going to do this and then we're going to do this and then, once this happens, this will be your next plan. But it's easy to just ignore the hard decisions and putting money down, we're like putting money where your mouth is. So I think we would have just moved a little bit faster and one of our ears from MVP. He always tells us like take your timeline and squish it down and then half it again and then half it again, and doing that, I think, would have saved us a lot of time. Less talk, more action. Actually. Yeah, Jack, what about you and your team? I don't think so. I think I honestly don't think we're to change anything. I got our start up was probably hit in terms of timing and business model harder than any other start up I would know. And guys still wouldn't change starting this business or how we started it, because we didn't know. You can't really plan for a pandemic, but how we handled it, I was super impressed with us and like we had tenzero beers that we were selling and that sale was going to pay for the Tenzero Beers. We lost it half an hour before we got it. So we had like twenty four hours to find twelve grand. And that story and itself as an origin story of housing ten that you didn't have storat. You're taking it right there and now we had a store in our basements of our university homes. Like that's not a safe place if you're living with certain guys in London. So I think that's story. And knowing that we could have the one of the biggest curveball staring at you and then being able to bounce back and keep moving, I think taught us so much and just gave us some resilience. So I think as a couple co founders, we felt pretty good. Now, looking back at the time, we were like this is terrible. Why are we doing this? Let's just like hide in our beds and like knock it out. But now it's like, you know what, we can do this and people have rallied around, so we feel good, awesome. Last one before let you go advice to your self, call it whatever, six months ago, you know, so you're sort of before you made the decision to go at your businesses full time or, for...

...some of you, full time for a period of time. Any advice that you'd give your six month ago self or the you know, fourth year university students that are just heading into their final year and maybe making, trying to make the decision of whether or not it's worth starting a business, full time, part time, anything really a dentrepreneurship. We could start with whomever would like to step up the hard question. I think for me I would just say listen to yourself. I find that just my personality. I really like to ask for advice and feedback, which I mean it's completely normal and I think is good, but I think sometimes I know the answer to my own questions and I still go out for that advice. So I think if I was talking to myself prior to actually fully launching into this venture. I would just say listen to yourself, listen to what you actually want and you know, anything that happens during that, you'll figure it out, because that's exactly what happened and I figured everything out. So, see, I think I would just need need that advice six months earlier. Go Jackie. Yeah, I'd say you don't need to reinvent the wheel to start a business. And it might be different for those who are doing this like full time out of university, but for me at least, like I just saw a whole in a mark it. I saw hundreds of people just in my neighborhood alone, who whose kids were like seriously, seriously sad about the summer and not getting any exercise whatsoever. I did not reinvent the wheel. I basically made a summer camp customized to a pandemic, and you don't really need to have some crazy idea to start a company. Cool. Yeah, I'd say don't ever think or wait for what you think's like the right time, because that time will rarely, if ever, come and then if you think about starting a business or doing any decision in life later, rare that ever becomes reality. So I think we just jumped in and thought why not try something, because if you start stressing about when you're going to make that decision, all of a sudden it becomes a negative in your life. And in the end I did this because it was a positive and I thought it was better than all the other alternatives. And I might not have been absolutely perfect, but you can make perfect anyway you want it to be. So I think just jumping in when you think you can do it. But there's not going to be a right time, so don't wait for it. It's great and that Onie. I think I would say once you decide what you want to do, or once you have a good idea of what you want to do for your business or even just for your goals in general, like don't be afraid to push really hard, because there are lots of people out there who want to help. There lots of people who just want to give back because they've been helped by other people in their life. And once we start it, looking hard and talking to people, it seems like there's this whole universe out there of people who just want you to succeed. So don't be afraid to like push for what you want and use those resources around you to help you get where you want to be. Cool, good advice. So and last one before we sign off, Natalie. Where can people find you or if you could have any ask of the audience? How can the audience help marlow? That would be great. You can follow our instagram. It's at we are marlow. Our website is we are Marlowcom. If you can sign up for emailist if you want to hear our product updates and when we're actually going to be coming to market, that'd be great too. And then our tick Tock, if you're interested in some funny videos, is is Marlow Tin Tamp entrepreneurs. So that's a good one too. Great Jack. How can the audience help you? Where do we find crank? So right now we're selling through various distribution methods, through bars and restaurants, delivery in the GTA, but...

...also we're going in the beer store August tent, which is huge for us. So look out for that and and head of the beer store. And if you don't want to go to the beer store, order online. You can maybe see me at your door with the case of beer. That's not so bad. But yeah, crank lightcom that's us. I will be taking you up on that offer, Jackie. How can the audience help you? Where do where do they find a Laura Athletics? Be Honest, I am completely bucked until mid September but depending how things go with me, I might continue it into the fall. On my website is a Laura athleticscom with too else they ll or athleticscom and chloe. How can we help you? Yeah, so you can go follow us on Instagram, facebook or tick talk. It's at apricotton girls. We haven't posted anything yet, but if you go follow us you'll know one we actually launch, which will be in the fall, which it's really exciting. Great. Well, Hey, like I said, I know that all of us are in not even plan B, maybe not even plans. See at this point I was not planning to to be teaching fully online this fall. I mode of much rather downe this interview in person with all of you, but I think we're trying to make trying to make the boulders our blessings here. So I really appreciate the effort that you folks are putting in. So cool to hear your stories about starting businesses in a pandemic and just to really appreciate the time and Kudos to you all for sticking your neck out and actually doing the hard thing. Thanks, Eric, thanks for having US first. Thank you. You've been listening to the I be entrepreneur podcast. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player or visit IV dot C, a forward slash entrepreneurship. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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